Chimamanda asks “Why Can’t a Smart Woman Love Fashion?” in Elle | Submits Photos for FashionBombDaily feature

Nigerian author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie is definitely one of the most fascinating people out there. Chimamanda is not afraid to share her point of view.

In February 2014, Elle.com published an article by Chimamanda titled “Why Can’t a Smart Woman Love Fashion?”. The byline tells us After years of dressing down to make the right impression, novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie wises up to a truth that her Nigerian mother has known all along.

Fast forward a few weeks to the 3rd of March 2014, Chimamanda surprised her fans when she submitted her photos to American fashion blog – Fashion Bomb Daily for their Fashion Bombshell of the Day feature.

Chimamanda-Ngozi-Adichie-from-Lagos

In the feature, she shares personal style photos including this AsoEbi shot along with commentary – “I have clothes that other people tell me are lovely but I don’t love them…And there are clothes I wear and love, about which my family and friends will say things like, ‘you look like you’re wearing a man’s shirt that isn’t your size.’ Or ‘is that really how that top is supposed to look?’ Or ‘I don’t understand this dress.’”

Click HERE to see Chimamanda’s Fashion Bombshell of the Day feature.

elle-chimamanga-child-v-mdnGoing back to her Elle.com article, read excerpts below.

On Her Mum’s Style
For her work as a university administrator, my mother also wore color: skirt suits, feminine swingy dresses belted at the waist, medium-high heels. She was stylish, but she was not unusual. Other middle-class Igbo women also invested in gold jewelry, in good shoes, in appearance. They searched for the best tailors to make clothes for them and their children. If they were lucky enough to travel abroad, they shopped mostly for clothes and shoes. They spoke of grooming almost in moral terms. The rare woman who did not appear well dressed and well lotioned was frowned upon, as though her appearance were a character failing. “She doesn’t look like a person,” my mother would say.

On How Her Style Changed when She moved to the USA
I made slight amendments to accommodate my new American life. A lover of dresses and skirts, I began to wear more jeans. I walked more often in America, so I wore fewer high heels, but always made sure my flats were feminine. I refused to wear sneakers outside a gym. Once, an American friend told me, “You’re overdressed.” In my short-sleeve top, cotton trousers, and high wedge sandals, I did see her point, especially for an undergraduate class. But I was not uncomfortable. I felt like myself.

On the Style Expectations for a “Serious Writer”
I had learned a lesson about Western culture: Women who wanted to be taken seriously were supposed to substantiate their seriousness with a studied indifference to appearance. For serious women writers in particular, it was better not to dress well at all, and if you did, then it was best to pretend that you had not put much thought into it. If you spoke of fashion, it had to be either with apology or with the slightest of sneers. The further your choices were from the mainstream, the better. The only circumstance under which caring about clothes was acceptable was when making a statement, creating an image of some sort to be edgy, eclectic, counterculture. It could not merely be about taking pleasure in clothes.

3-Chimamanda-Ngozi-Adichie-from-LagosOn Embracing her Love of Fashion Now
I am now 36 years old. During my most recent book tour, I wore, for the first time, clothes that made me happy. My favorite outfit was a pair of ankara-print shorts, a damask top, and yellow high-heel shoes. Perhaps it is the confidence that comes with being older. Perhaps it is the good fortune of being published and read seriously, but I no longer pretend not to care about clothes. Because I do care. I love embroidery and texture. I love lace and full skirts and cinched waists. I love black, and I love color. I love heels, and I love flats. I love exquisite detailing. I love shorts and long maxidresses and feminine jackets with puffy sleeves. I love colored trousers. I love shopping. I love my two wonderful tailors in Nigeria, who often give me suggestions and with whom I exchange sketches. I admire well-dressed women and often make a point to tell them so. Just because. I dress now thinking of what I like, what I think fits and flatters, what puts me in a good mood. I feel again myself—an idea that is no less true for being a bit hackneyed.

You can read the complete article via Elle.com

So let us know…Have you had to modify your style to be taken seriously? Do you feel you have to hide your love of fashion?

Photo Credit: Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie via Fashion Bomb Daily | Elle.com

76 Comments on Chimamanda asks “Why Can’t a Smart Woman Love Fashion?” in Elle | Submits Photos for FashionBombDaily feature
  • Beht why March 7, 2014 at 8:16 am

    I love her.. Her style is so unique and so her..

    • Al Blossom March 7, 2014 at 11:22 am

      I AM OFFICIALLY IN LOVE AND OBSESSED AND IN LOVE AND OBSESSED WITH THIS WOMAN!

  • SOLO ACT March 7, 2014 at 8:23 am

    this woman like to fuss about anything and everything. who in the world said women that love fashion are not smart in the first place. all my teachers that were women where well dressed, they where not wearing gucci but they dressed nicely. i dont know what that has to do with intelligence. Now u cant compare a fashion degree to an engineering degree or law or Math degree.

    • comments police March 7, 2014 at 10:17 am

      Why can’t you compare them? Fashion is a multi billion dollar industry, it takes FIVE years to complete a proper degree in fashion. The amount of technical skill that goes into garment construction, footwear construction, fashion marketing, business development for fashion, psychology (yes, you have to study a person’s thinking methods to see how to appeal to them. When you walk into a store you NEVER set out to go to and buy something you can’t afford, you are part of a studied demographic. You’ve been targeted). A lot goes into the study of fashion. It is not the glitz and the glam you see. So it is definitely comparable to any other degree. It provides one of the three necessities of man. Do not be ignorant.

      • sigh March 7, 2014 at 12:28 pm

        Thank you jare. Ignorance is truly a disease. The fool should walk around naked now. hiss..

      • Girl Bye! March 7, 2014 at 5:02 pm

        Well said, you have summed it up perfectly; thank you for schooling these people x

      • SOLO ACT March 7, 2014 at 10:45 pm

        please all degrees are not equal oo!! a fashion degree is not equal to a medical one, neither is a journalisim degree equal to an engineering one. but if u choose to live in LALA land its ok! to me STEM degrees are the ultimate, if u want to make an impact in the world u have to be in tech. ie facebook, whatsapp, even the graphical / computer engineers at bella. when the G8 sommet is being held, they dont speak about vogue. if u want to build a strong ECONOMY IT has to be math and science. why do u think ASIA is the world leader now? it has nothing to do with MAN or WOMAN.

    • Yemi Alade Is Still Really, Really Tryna Be Sexy March 7, 2014 at 10:26 am

      Funny thing is She’s “fussing” over everything on Elle, you’re here fussing over her on BN. Look at yourself.

      • Rick March 7, 2014 at 12:48 pm

        You are here on BN too, so, really, what’s your point?

    • sigh March 7, 2014 at 11:03 am

      You can’t compare a math degree to a medical degree either… u can’t compare degrees, period. Don’t demean fashion, this is exactly what Chimamanda is saying!

    • AA March 7, 2014 at 2:15 pm

      Erm, yes you can compare a fashion degree to all those degrees. It is just as valid, maybe even more. I have never met a person with a fashion degree that was job hunting for over a year, never.

      • ada March 7, 2014 at 9:07 pm

        Biko. AA, Where do you live? Because in America, there are a lot who have no job or have to work in retail folding clothes. All degrees are not equal. But we cant undermine any degree either. People are intelligent depending on what it is they are good at

  • valgirl March 7, 2014 at 8:33 am

    I think real confidence comes with being yourself n loving every bit of ur person fashion inclusive.being smart doesn’t mean shabby dressing, really happy for her.

  • Dr. N March 7, 2014 at 8:38 am

    The opposite is the case in Nigeria. The smarter u are, d better people expect u to dress. I would doubt your “smartness” if u keep showing up inappropriately dressed. Again, being fashionable is not being tacky, lol. I am inclined to dress down, but I have 3 sisters who keep me in check. More drama. My mom at almost 60 doesn’t wear flats even indoors.

    drnsmusings.wordpress.com

    • Bleed Blue March 7, 2014 at 10:14 am

      Ah ah! Heels even indoors? Your mum is not messing about oh! I love it when elderly women are comfortable in being stylish…

      When I used to live in Abuja and had to make lots of trips, I loved sitting at the airport watching Abuja women in their element. Me I’m thinking it’s airport waka and left to me I would be in jeans, a t-shirt and flats so I can be comfy, meanwhile they’re all set for runway catwalk levels. Those women be fierce!

      • gia March 7, 2014 at 4:43 pm

        xD ahahaha! this comment is so funny!

    • Stylefash25 March 7, 2014 at 12:24 pm

      I love your mum already.

      stylefash25.blogspot.com

    • LKANONY April 16, 2014 at 3:40 pm

      INDEED….Where my family’s from (Ghana) dressing inappropriately or too down implies one is of the illiterate group or uneducated sector. The association is, ones appearance and education reflects their socio economic status. Thus if you are not appearing in a well groomed or fashionable stature, you most likely had not been exposed to higher education which generally consist of middle/upper middle class and upper class students/individuals…..hence “the smarter you are, the better people expect you to dress…” I feel in this article, what she’s trying to point out is similar to say particular professions i.e. LAW. From what I’ve been informed by peers that are attorneys for example the dress code is more stringent in terms of what type of colors are considered appropriate and the like. So cosidering the environment of legal minds and the stringent dress code, the idea is fashion is “taboo” so to speak. The focus should be to “look the part” and fashion or style may not fit in the formula. So generally, talking fashion appears to not be the norm within the most intellectual groups but individually, one may or can choose to just venture out and be him or herself which is apparantly what Ms. Adichie chose to do in the end.

  • Dare to be March 7, 2014 at 8:43 am

    Firstly she talks way too much out if point these days …………. Secondly this article is blc she grew up in the east. She needs to come to Lagos or Abuja and see the way ladies and even mothers in our time invest in their appearance, dress nicely and always looks well put. At least my mum and all her friends were like that

    • Nikk March 7, 2014 at 9:30 am

      Gbam, she talks and fuss abt irrelevant things…. So overrated

      • Onye Ara March 7, 2014 at 9:55 am

        Welcome to the club.
        She is a very intelligent and opinionated woman but pretending that you have an opinion worth hearing on every topic is the sign of stupidity.
        With her obvious poor fashion sense, she now wants to be fashion critic on Elle,really?
        She should stick to what she knows best and stop making a fool of herself.

      • sigh March 7, 2014 at 12:24 pm

        Niik, Onye Ara @ Dare to be:
        I find that ppl like you can’t handle others having opinions. Are y’all so insecure?
        Bunch of hypocrites coming to comment on Adichie’s life, like she’s living for u.
        And who is the illiterate amongst u that said she’s trying to be a fashion critic? Giving her valuable opinion doesn’t make her a critic. U sound like you dress like a lumberjack or a typical African church choir member. Have several \__

      • AA March 7, 2014 at 2:19 pm

        Wow!!! You guys are hating on someone that is living a life that can only exist in your dreams…ever wondered why your lives are miserable? It could be the tremendous amount of bile and hate in your system. Damn! She has an opinion, I know most Nigerians hate Nigerian women having opinions, but deal with it, times are changing. Get over your weak minded selves!!

      • i hate bullshit March 7, 2014 at 3:37 pm

        @AA so every discussion is hating …….You are the one with a weak mind and limited vocabulary hence you want to bully others from expressing what they think about an article . I mean miserable lives????,,,,,,shaking my head . I pity people like you, who cannot engaged in a civilized conversation hence you throw the word HATING

      • Onye Ara March 7, 2014 at 7:14 pm

        @sigh and @AA, both of you are too funny to be real.
        So you have access to my dreams and aspirations and know that Ms. Adichie is living a life that I can only dream of?
        She has put her views out in the public and that is an invitation for the public to comment.
        Also, I think you are too old to be using the word ‘hating’. Try something else.
        I simply expressed a view that she should stop sounding like an authority on everything.
        She is a good writer,a very good one at that. Not much else.
        What exactly is the crux of your rant?

      • LKANONY April 16, 2014 at 4:15 pm

        :-)….Well….considering this article was discussed for a fashion magazine, it can be considered relevant. I think she just wanted to bring to the forefront (for discussion sake) some underground issues with women feeling restricted to completely feeling free to express their own personal style simply because of their intellectual/professional groups that they are part of….but well…to be honest with you I can agree that alot of fashion magazines tend to make anything in reflection of style or fashion over the top or “overrated”.

    • Nuna March 7, 2014 at 9:32 am

      Dare to be, u need to step out of Lagos every now and then ok. So u think people in the east don’t know how to dress? Kmt!

      • Angel March 7, 2014 at 10:34 am

        @ Nuna, I hate to say this; I quite agree with Dare to be. People in the east aren’t really fashionable, yes they sometimes wear expensive stuff but most time tacky (that something is overly expensive doesn’t make it nice especially when it’s not well put together) another thing they do a lot is they follow certain trends like crazy, I was at Enugu like 3 yrs back and mehn! It was like everywhere I turned there’s some lady wearing one particular pant, it was in different shades, colors, shape and size….almost everybody had this pant on, that ain’t cool biko. By the way, I be proper Igbo but I have to agree, east people no sabi abeg..

      • Bimpe March 7, 2014 at 11:12 am

        I definitely hope she speaks for only herself and her little world and hopefully the readers of this article wont think Nigerian women are like this
        A lot of smart women in Nigeria in the 70, 80 , 90 and even now pay attention to their looks and has nothing to do with whether you are smart or not . I would even say the opposite, the smart ones are even more powerful dressers so this are statement is unfounded .

        Chimamanda seems like a very difficult person to be around, someone who fusses over nothing and think so highly off her opinion even if it is pointless . …. she is becoming to bore me FAST

      • Nky March 7, 2014 at 12:08 pm

        @Nuna abeg say the truth ooo. I live in Enugu , 90% of the people i see look like clowns even d ones with money . You cant compare them to the carriage and air that Lagos or Abuja women have when they dress. I schooled in Unilag and the difference is 7-up

        Back to the Topic , every time Chimamanda opens her mouth my love for her goes down . She obviously has a terrible sense of fashion but i do praise her for promoting african outfit a lot , but why then stereotype that most smart women usually dont love fashion. SAYS WHO? …….. Never really heard that saying before, in Nigeria usually the smart ones have more money , hence they have more exposed , travel and shop more

    • nene March 7, 2014 at 10:46 am

      but isnt it how most authors are? i know it’s a stereotype but i find that most artistic people, especially artists and authors tend to be highly opinionated and pretentious. Chimamnda was a beautiful child who grew into beautiful woman, look at that hair!

    • waka waka March 7, 2014 at 11:09 am

      Hmm…lagos and abj are not the only cities in the world…come to London, nyc, hk, dubai where if u work in science, engineering and medicine and are female, you are expected to dress geeky and not care how you look. If I had a penny for the number of times I have heard you dont look like a dr, I would be a millionaire by now. I am constantly under-estimated at work because I dress well and wear heels. Never mind that I am a renowned expert in what I do. People automatically look at me and think ‘hmmm, she is one of these city/wall street/ banking types who is after loads of money but not really smart enough to hack it in the sciences’…very annoying to say the least. And before you all jump down my throat, I dont agree that city/wall st types are not smart, just conveying the general message I receive from my colleagues at work and elsewhere.

      • Bunmi March 7, 2014 at 6:37 pm

        @waka you are WRONG, I work for a very well known IT firm in califonia, most of the employees are well dressed, females with lovely corporate wears and even my husband who is a doctor dresses very well…… This ur statement is a load of rubbish, your either stylish or u not. Has nothing to do with ur profession

      • waka waka March 7, 2014 at 10:51 pm

        Eerm Bunmi, I think you missed the entire point of my comment. Please re-read it again. I was not saying that you cannot be stylish in any profession. I am saying that sometimes you are not taken seriously in a male dominated work environment if you are. Get the difference? Not sure what is rubbish about that. Go check out civil engineering firms or medical hospitals in london if you do not believe me. But anyhoo naija and our wahala….once we start, we never finish…chai!

      • waka waka March 7, 2014 at 11:00 pm

        Ps: as I mentioned in my response to Magz, just because that is your experience doesnt make it true for every city in America talk less of other cities in the world. I am pretty sure I did not list california in the cities I mentioned. The specific cities I mentioned in my comment were places I had experience of working in. Also note that your husband is male and my comment referred specifically to women in the sciences and engineering or are you married to a woman??? Anyhoo, please take several seats ‘Ms Bunmi of a single IT firm which is apparently now representative of the entire world’

      • waka waka March 7, 2014 at 11:03 pm

        And I know california is a state btw…just going with the flow of my rant @ ‘Miss Bunmi anyone that has a different point of view talks rubbish’ jare

    • Miss_Flygerian March 7, 2014 at 12:46 pm

      Couldn’t have put this any better. She grew up in the East so I can understand if she was used to seeing people dress down to fit in. Because people in the East are generally not fashionable. In the major cities like Abj, Lag, PH…you have to dress to look the part. My mom is one of the top executives where she works so she is always at the top of her style game.

      Also, Americans are generally not fashion conscious. They hardly put it any effort in dressing up except they’re going to a major event. It’s just the places Chimamanda has been because there are many places in this world where smart women are expected to look on point.

    • March Thirteen March 14, 2014 at 4:40 am

      Oh Lord. Reading comprehension is a major problem on here.
      According to CA, her mother and her peers dressed well, they took pride in their appearance regardless of class, and so did she till she became a writer and became attuned to the undercurrents of what it takes to be a female writer who wants to be taken seriously. It is that simple. How you get on comparing what she has said with Abuja or Lagos people and style is lost on me and should be on anyone who actually read and understood what she has written.
      On talking way too much or off point, in this age where every Tom, Dick, Harry and you have access to information, we all have opinions. The validity of those opinions is not the issue here. You have an opinion and BN has given you a platform to share it, and you’ll hop from topic to topic sharing your opinion whether you are an expert or not. She has an opinion, but her work as a writer has afforded her a bigger platform, yet you are unable to see that or extend the same courtesy to her that even BN has given you without reproach. All she has said is that she is trying to style herself in a way that is true to what she likes and not to be stifled by what she thinks is the judgement of people about her as a writer. She has written about her experience and nobody else’s, she is not giving prescriptions on how people should dress, nothing she has written indicates that she wants to be a fashion critic, yet it rubs you the wrong way. Why? I ‘d like to think it is not out of meanness, but because people don’t read. It really is a shame. If you read something and don’t understand, it’s okay to say, I don’t understand, yet we act like we know and understand. It’s amazing.
      Most people have heard this or a version of this before, “He who knows not and knows not he knows not: he is a fool – shun him. He who knows not and knows he knows not: he is simple – teach him. He who knows and knows not he knows: he is asleep – wake him. He who knows and knows he knows: he is wise – follow him”
      @ Dare to be, Onye Ara, Bimpe, Nik et al. Who are you?

      • Yemi March 26, 2014 at 11:55 am

        I read your commentary and fell in love with it. I think it’s time people start critically reading people’s opinions instead of the ‘headlines’.

      • LKANONY April 16, 2014 at 4:37 pm

        INDEED…..THAT’S EXACTLY what I’ve gathered from the article overall…..you truly could not have said it better.

      • Ezzy May 5, 2014 at 7:22 pm

        Pls Bella where is the like button? I so love your comment. From some of the comments here, I was not sure if it was the same article we read or maybe there was another one I did not see. Reading is meant to be enjoyed sometimes. Its not all times you try to pick a hole. I did not see anything wrong in what she wrote about. She wrote about her life and her point of view. I don’t mind reading other people’s point of view. Its part of the learning process.

  • Troll March 7, 2014 at 8:54 am

    I think I’m liking Chimamanda now. When she first came out, I always felt she was too serious and pretentious. I’m glad she’s now finally being herself no matter the expectations. That’s what makes a happy writer.

  • @edDREAMZ March 7, 2014 at 9:28 am

    I just hate this madam…..
    .
    .
    .
    ***CURRENTLY IN JUPITER***

    • AA March 7, 2014 at 2:25 pm

      she does not know you. na you dey waste energy on top her matter.

  • Anonymous March 7, 2014 at 9:39 am

    I love her skirt!

  • http://www.thelmathinks.blogspot.com/ March 7, 2014 at 9:42 am

    Troll, I honestly know if I like her more now, or less…. I think of Chimamanda and her recent interviews and opinions, and the one thing that comes to mind is one of the few things I took from Sadiq Abacha’s interview; brilliance is not perfection.

    Dr N your comment made me smile. My mother, in her mid- 60s, never dresses down. Even when she’s indoors, she wears have jeans and tops, jewelry and make up. She wears slippers but would wear crocks as opposed to “Dunlop”. Her hair must always be in place; no hairnet out of bed. Jeez, it’s exhausting just to watch because I’m the exact opposite. *covers face*.

    thelmathinks.blogspot.com

  • http://www.thelmathinks.blogspot.com/ March 7, 2014 at 9:43 am

    *honestly don’t know

  • shannaro March 7, 2014 at 9:44 am

    Oh man see perfection

  • Modella March 7, 2014 at 10:22 am

    Bn give us the full glam,too lazy to open the site…@ Nikki,did I hear you. Say she is overrated???

  • Magz March 7, 2014 at 10:58 am

    I kinda agree with her. I love fashion and makeup and nice hair. in short, i love dressing up . When i get excited at numbers or chemistry structures, people look at me like “she doesn’t look like someone who is intelligent”. Some students did not believe i was a Biochemistry student till my last year. There was always this look of shock on their faces whenever i told them i was studying Biochemistry. People still tell me “you don’t look like you are brilliant” and i have learnt to shrug it off.
    So i understand where she is coming from

    • waka waka March 7, 2014 at 11:49 am

      Magz, clapping my hands oh. I totally agree with you. See my reply to ‘dare to be’. Sometimes, people only see their own experiences. Calling Chimamanda out for detailing her own experiences and the injustices she has faced is like saying, because I dont consider her complaints important to me, then her voice should be silent. There are many of us that agree with her on a lot of her positions and many more that share the same experiences that she has done. Most of these women to do npt have a public voice to air their frustrations. It is good that Chimamanda uses her platform to give a voice to these women including myself. I can say without a doubt that I have read and listened to all of her articles and pieces and there is not a single one I disagree with. In fact, a lot of the time, it is like she is saying what I have been itching to scream and shout out loud in people’s faces. As Magz and myself have shown, her voice is representative of some women at least! Well done Chimamanda!

    • waka waka March 7, 2014 at 12:24 pm

      Magz, clapping my hands oh. I totally agree with you. See my reply to ‘dare to be’. Sometimes, people only see their own experiences. Calling Chimamanda out for detailing her own experiences and the injustices she has faced is like saying, because I dont consider her complaints important to me, then her voice should be silent. There are many of us that agree with her on a lot of her positions and many more that share the same experiences that she has done. Most of these women to do npt have a public voice to air their frustrations. It is good that Chimamanda uses her platform to give a voice to these women including myself. I can say without a doubt that I have read and listened to all of her articles and pieces and there is not a single one I disagree with. In fact, a lot of the time, it is like she is saying what I have been itching to scream and shout out loud in people’s faces. As Magz and myself have shown, her voice is representative of some women at least! Well done Chimamanda!

    • (0_0) Confused face March 7, 2014 at 2:04 pm

      I am confused , Is Biochemistry an important degree or since when are biochemists considered smart . Abeg have a /_

      • Joan85 March 7, 2014 at 2:46 pm

        No wonder your face is confused, mscheewww, sitting there tryna berate a hardworking sister’s degree. My friend, be not ignorant!! Biochemistry in naija is not a big deal. In the Western world, on the other hand, it can be the beginning of major cheddar for you. Google is also your friend :)

  • Isi 1 March 7, 2014 at 11:08 am

    Proud of you Chimamannda….

  • Yve March 7, 2014 at 1:18 pm

    *Sigh* Does everything have to be a debate?
    Tired already.

  • LION March 7, 2014 at 2:12 pm

    It’s so sad this lady and her likes are given a global platform to air shallow insecure opinions and would be used as a yard stick for most Nigerian women, Chi you are a brilliiant writer but your redundant opinions on inconsequential issues recently are lame and embarrassing. Both my grandmas were very smart and fashionable, my mom(my role model) is very very smart and very veryyyyyyyyyy stylish, I am smart with an enviable no of geeky degrees and very stylish, I know a lot of friends and colleagues globally who are veryyyyyyyyyyy smart, first class material women like me and are stylish. Being stylish has nothing to do with how smart you are, it’s in your DNA. You have it or you don’t, you could be tall, short, black, pretty, geeky, smart, dull or whatever, if you have it, you have it, if you don’t sorry smart won’t help even a stylist will help just a little cos we would see it. This may well be the point you are driving at, even though it should not be up for discussion, but You my dear on the contrary do not seem to have it in good measures. My opinion (I’m sorry, I will always support women and not bring them down) but girl you need to chill on your self idolization discussing trivial matters, it’s getting worrisome in this era. if it’s not hair, its skin colour or name or crap load. Is this what feminism is? It’s irritating. Stop it!

    • Bling March 7, 2014 at 3:51 pm

      Lol…the last sentence got me.

    • Xtsy March 7, 2014 at 3:53 pm

      Na Beyonce spirit dey worry d mgbeke

    • waka waka March 7, 2014 at 7:10 pm

      Lol @ Ms Lion…what is the problem nooow? U sound so angry.
      Na wa!

    • Daeneris March 15, 2014 at 10:10 pm

      Dear Lion. people like you probably failed ‘comprehension’ in school because of your apparent inability to read an article and understand it. Let me break it down for you because it is obvious that you just skimmed through the article, jumped to conclusions and based your comment on your erroneous conclusions. Chimamanda did not say that smart women are unable to be stylish. She said that in the western world she learnt that women who wanted to be taken seriously had to act like they were indifferent to fashion. Here’s a direct quote from the article. I’ve taken the liberty of quoting it for you since you’re apparently too busy to read it properly but not too busy to make lame comments based on wrong conclusions.
      ‘I had learned a lesson about Western culture: Women who wanted to be taken seriously were supposed to substantiate their seriousness with a studied indifference to appearance. For serious women writers in particular, it was better not to dress well at all, and if you did, then it was best to pretend that you had not put much thought into it. If you spoke of fashion, it had to be either with apology or with the slightest of sneers. The further your choices were from the mainstream, the better. The only circumstance under which caring about clothes was acceptable was when making a statement, creating an image of some sort to be edgy, eclectic, counterculture. It could not merely be about taking pleasure in clothes.’

  • LION March 7, 2014 at 4:44 pm

    So waka waka, what you are trying to say or feel like is that doctors are smarter that wall street people who like money but not you geeky goody two shoes? There we go again CRAPLOAD! Imagine this warped ideas you tell yourselves and let people tell you. Y’all need to get off your stereotypical high horses you have deliriously climbed and be you, no one cares!!!! You are stylish or you are not. PS Xty, maybe o, Beyonce too is not stylish as with the norm, but she is doing her, I dont know why these self grandiose sisters too will just not do themselves and give us a break!

    • Leonora March 7, 2014 at 6:44 pm

      Why are you guys taking it p now? They are her opinions, isn’t she entitled to have them? Should she modify them because the world has decided to place her on some high horse?

  • LION March 7, 2014 at 4:45 pm

    than*

    • waka waka March 7, 2014 at 7:03 pm

      Lol…please re-read my comment in its entirety before resorting feverish typing. Note the last part of my comment where I said this is exactly not what I am trying to say? Patience is a virtue my dear! Surulere :p

      • waka waka March 7, 2014 at 7:05 pm

        Resorting to* Oops! Lol moment

  • Leonora March 7, 2014 at 6:42 pm

    I can relate to this. Reading this I realized I actually have had to modify my style because of some misguided belief that I couldnt be taken seriously if I looked like a fashion plate. Oh well, who cares…Some clients do though…If you’ve ever been in the banking/finance/audit world asin eh!!!

  • Youhearditherefirst March 7, 2014 at 6:46 pm

    This aunty talks too much jare

  • Radiant March 7, 2014 at 9:35 pm

    And once again, we are getting worked up. #breatheeveryone

  • LION March 7, 2014 at 9:54 pm

    Loll waka waka yes I am o! Why can’t people just be and not throw it or impose it in our faces. My point is it is ok to be stylish, trendy, fashionable, geek looking, tomboyish, whatever look, doctor, lawyer, receptionist, writer, pepperseller whatever and wear your hair relaxed , straight, nappy bald, Brazilian, Peruvian all join just don’t come and tell us you are better and imply someone else isn’t. I may be wrong, but we really don’t give a TOSS! Enough! It’s all these stereotypes causing people to sit down behind their computers to abuse people’s personal choices. Just do you, love yourself and love or at least respect others.

    • Alex March 9, 2014 at 5:45 am

      I completely agree with this comment! my sentiments exactly

  • LION March 7, 2014 at 9:56 pm

    BTW Chimamanda I love your cute girly dress the only thing stylish here for me. :)

  • osarodion edosa March 10, 2014 at 1:24 pm

    First let’s be honest, Chimamanda cannot dress to save her life. Secondly of course a woman who looks well put together is hardly taken seriously till she opens her mouth and speaks intelligently or does her job far better than others.

  • jaybee March 10, 2014 at 3:49 pm

    Oh well,i understand where she’s coming from,and i agree with posters who said the east can hardly be used as a yardstick for fashionable women….people tend to put smart people on this silly pedestal that they have to look serious all the time,hence a very fashionable lady for instance is not considered brilliant until u get to know the stuff she’s made of..stereotypes.

  • Ms_Chief March 17, 2014 at 11:09 am

    Jeez, I am totally ashamed of half the comments here. Did you guys even read the feature? I want to believe not reading it is the problem and not lack of comprehension. How many of you who claim to be super stylish and probably pretty too would say she hasn’t been perceived as unserious/harebrained by teachers, colleagues, clients ESP if you are in a male dominated industry?

  • ruby April 11, 2014 at 3:03 pm

    why do people always feel the need to pull each other down, talk each other down and insult each other just because they can? it’s not right. if you don’t like an article, you don’t have to comment. go and read something else. abi? smh

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