Connect with us

Features

ABG: Top Ten Books Every Nigerian Should Read

AfricanBadGirl

Published

 on

The growing popularity of books these days spurred, in great part, by the new African voices/authors, has led to a growing reading culture which I hope will continue to grow exponentially.
Books have the power to make you a time traveller taking you into the past to learn things you never witnessed, and can also take you places around the world (no visa required). In our society where history is not as widely known as it should be, we have books as other sources of knowledge (a lot of times more interesting than textbooks!)
In the midst of all these books, I’d like to present to you my top 10 books that every Nigerian should have read. These 10 books to me are foundational to the Nigerian. They tell of the cores of Nigeria – our past, our people and our spirit. Although mostly fictional, they are not limited to fiction. I just enjoy reading fiction more.

This list is by no means conclusive, as there are loads of books out there that also brilliantly capture the core Nigerian experience which in the end varies for every Nigerian. I’ve tried to include books that explore a broad range of topics in Nigeria, and will tell you why each book made it on this top 10 must-read list without telling you the story. No spoilers… I promise!

*The list follows no particular order.

Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe
It is the most widely read book in modern African Literature. Hopefully your secondary school made you read this, especially if you were a Literature student. If it did not make too much sense to you then, please dig it out of your pile of old books, dust it clean and re-read. TFA is the story of a man clinging unto his cultural/traditional beliefs even in the face of change. Not being ready to change when change comes, often has dire consequences as Okonkwo finds out. TFA made me question groupthink- if everybody is thinking the same way, does that mean they are thinking the right way? How do you embrace change/development without losing your values? How was colonialism handled in the past- and how differently do we handle Western influence today?


Efuru by Flora Nwapa
If TFA is the ‘gala’, Efuru is the La Casera. The author was the 1st AFRICAN female writer- which is greatness on its own already. This is enough reason to read it. Its theme is feminism, the difference in males and females in society. Female genital mutilation, marriage and pregnancy are also issues touched upon. And it’s one of those books we should all have as a memorabilia – “This book was written by the 1st ever African female writer she was Nigerian”. Reading this shows you how far we’ve come from Efuru’s time, and also where we still need to go.


Everything Good Will Come by Sefi Atta
Follows a young girl Enitan as she grows up. Her half-caste friend, her religious mother, and dating are her personal experience set against a Nigeria post- Biafra, with freedom of speech being a hot topic. On reading the last page of this book, I felt hopeful; everything good will come indeed. It explores a dark time in Nigerian history where journalism was almost suicidal. And leads you to question the difference today? Beauty ideals then and today? Sefi Atta has won several awards for her works including the 2006 Wole Soyinka prize for Literature in Africa.


Secret Lives of Baba Segi’s Wives by Lola Shoneyin
As you may guess from the title, it’s about a polygamous family with the head of the family being Baba Segi. Previously, all 3 wives with unique characters find a way to survive together till the 4th wife comes along being the only literate one. The picture that pops in my head is ‘Fuji House of Commotion.’ Although both stories are different, they share the common feature of comedy. Each wife gets her turn to narrate and tell her story. The book touches on polygamy, rape, and African tradition, issues very prevalent today. This was one of the fastest books I read- it’s hard to put down once you start. I found myself ‘mising’ it as it drew to an end. Rape in our community is rampant and is something we need to talk about rather than avoid if we want to eradicate it.
PS – Watch Lola Shoneyin’s Ted Talk on Boys, Sex and Control-the topic of rape is clearly something she’s passionate about.

book-halfyellow
Half of a Yellow Sun by Chimamanda Ngozi- Adichie
Before this, I did not know much about the Biafran war, did not even know that the title of the book came from the description of the Biafran flag. The Biafran war is a major part of Nigerian history that is oftentimes overlooked. HoaYS brings it to life in a very vivid way. Apart from that, the love story between Odenigbo and Olanna goes through trying times of betrayal, in-law drama among others. Chimamanda tells the story beautifully that when the war is declared over in the book, you look around you to almost hug someone in celebration. Learn some Nigeria history with this one.

No Longer at Ease by Chinua Achebe
Clearly I love his writing style – he translates complex ideas in the simplest ways. NLE tells the story of a ‘Just Got Back’ (a returnee from studying abroad) determined not to engage in bribery and corruption. One main theme of course is bribery and corruption which is a problem we face in Nigeria by us and for us. (It’s a democracy really – for the people, by the people). The book does lead you to question how corruption creeps into ANY society (after all corruption is not copyrighted to Africa, but other countries face it as well), how much of it is individual and circumstantial? What would you do in Obi’s situation? Even today we are faced with similar situations where to be corrupt or not, that is the question. Right from the choice to offer police bribe or the choice to ask someone cash for a contract, do we act any differently? Chinua Achebe continues to be a literary giant in Africa and is fondly called the founding father of African Literature.

Ake_the_Years_of_Childhood_Rex_CollingsAke: The Years of Childhood by Wole Soyinka
Wole Soyinka is the first African to be given a Nobel Prize in Literature. He has numerous great book, playwrights and poems out, but I chose Ake his memoir. Situated in Ake, he tells the story of his childhood and we get to see a transitional period in Nigeria through the eyes of little Wole. From traditional Yoruba worship to Christianity, British rule to Nigeria’s independence. Again, there’s the battle between new and old, which begs the question how do we maintain our values while, we become influenced by the West? Are we doing better today? Are we balancing the Western civilization with ours, or are we simply engaging in an exchange? You also get to meet interesting characters as Wole grows up like, You-Mean-Mayself?

Walking with Shadows by Jude Idibia
Now this is about a taboo subject in Nigeria – homosexuality. It’s not the most interesting read, and honestly I had to push myself to finish it, but the reason it’s on this list is because of the subject area. It tells the story of a young homosexual Nigerian who has been ‘casted’, and the reactions of family members and colleagues. It makes you stop and question how you would react in such situation. Which character responses the best way? How should we respond to homosexuality in an African space?

Joys of Motherhood by Buchi Emecheta
This takes on among other topics, the role of women in the society. And seeing the numerous beautiful Nigerian women around me (including myself of course), the role woman play is an important topic and will continue to be so as we all exist together. Nnu Ego indeed enjoys the ‘joys’ of Motherhood. This reminds me of the hash tag that trended a while ago in the Nigerian twittersphere #BeingawomaninNigeria. What joys of motherhood can be shared with fathers, and vice versa.

A Swamp full of Dollars by Michael Peel
I know the author isn’t Nigerian (I did not promise that they all would be) but he tells an integral part of the Nigerian story- OIL. The crisis in the Niger-Delta and how e take consign Western corporations. Although we may not always like to, it’s good every now and then to see ourselves through the eyes of other people, and this book certain affords us to do that, and gives us both sides of the oil story. After all there are two sides to every coin.

Some other good reads on the Diasporan Experience of a Nigerian are Open City by Teju Cole, London Life, Lagos Living by Bobo Omotayo, Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie.

Do you agree that these books are the top 10 Nigerian reads today? If not, what books do you think should be included and why?

Photo Credit: Dreamstime | Racorn

African Bad Girl is an avid book lover and Pan-Africanist, who is passionate about the economic, political and mental freedom of Africa. Currently working on her master’s degree, she also awaits the technology that would translates your thoughts into words on a computer screen. (and auto sieve out the rude thoughts!)

217 Comments

  1. Funmi

    August 10, 2015 at 3:47 pm

    This is a great list of books. I’ve read most and have really enjoyed them. I’ll add one more to your list which i discovered a few months back…

    Daughters who walk this path by Yejide Kilanko.

    • goldfinch

      August 10, 2015 at 10:53 pm

      What about ‘under the brown rusted roof’ by bimbo adelakun?

    • Cocolette

      August 11, 2015 at 12:36 pm

      Please, good people of the Lord, where can one get them old african literature…chinua achebe, buchi emecheta, cyprian ekwensi, elechi amadi n the rest, I have searched n i can just find a few. This is a sincere plea from a starved mind.? If there’s anyone with an extensive library of african authors who wouldn’t mind lending me (i promise to return promptly n in good condition) , i wouldn’t mind either. Epp me plis! My email is [email protected] if you decide to let The Lord use you. Thank you.

    • lauren

      August 11, 2015 at 1:46 pm

      Download the Kindle app. I have read all of Achebe’s books on Kindle. You’ll also find loads of books by African authors. I have recently been gravitating towards written books solely by Africans about Africans. I just read a book called fine boys and another called I do not come to you by chance. Sadly I’m not a Seffi Atta fan

    • lauren

      August 11, 2015 at 2:08 pm

      I just installed the good reads app. So many Nigerian titles and classics. BN thanks for this post.

    • Anonymous Aboki

      August 11, 2015 at 6:47 pm

      Expect my mail..

    • Mz Socially Awkward...

      August 12, 2015 at 3:29 pm

      @ lauren, I thought I was the only one who couldn’t sink properly into her books. Heard laudable things about her, though so I suppose my reading preferences just haven’t melded with her narrative style. Much in the same way some people can’t read Adichie’s books.

    • x

      September 16, 2015 at 4:01 pm

      Check Konga for these books, and they’re affordable too.

    • Cocolette

      August 11, 2015 at 12:44 pm

      And even ‘Pacesetters series’. Father! The thought of having all these books to read again just makes my mouth water

    • TA

      August 11, 2015 at 4:27 pm

      Me too! I’m actually salivating.

  2. Bloop

    August 10, 2015 at 3:57 pm

    The Concubine…Please, why is this book not on the list? Some good simple books are; Passport of Mallam Ilia n just maybe,maybe African Night’s Entertainment. These are quite lovely books I read while still at Secondary school

    • Funke

      August 10, 2015 at 7:03 pm

      The concubine is the best African novel ever!!!

    • Rue

      August 10, 2015 at 7:38 pm

      I know right? I love violence by festus iyayi. It is intricately woven and beautiful to read. Ironic that the writer died through a” violent” car accident.

    • TA

      August 11, 2015 at 11:33 am

      @ Bloop lol. Recently discussed Passport of Mallam Illia and Concubine with a friend. Great reads, very good books.

    • Dr. Dee

      August 11, 2015 at 12:11 pm

      Yes!!! I second this

    • Anonymous Aboki

      August 11, 2015 at 6:47 pm

      You clearly are a fan of Cyprian Ekwensi; understandly, he was a god..

    • Idomagirl

      August 14, 2015 at 9:24 pm

      Yes! The Concubine is number one for me as well.

  3. hushhy

    August 10, 2015 at 4:14 pm

    I will also add another one; so long a letter- Mariam ba. Nice collections up there, though.

    • Toyin

      August 11, 2015 at 10:51 am

      So Long a Letter by Mariama Ba is a masterpiece. I want to read it again.

  4. bruno

    August 10, 2015 at 4:16 pm

    the number one book every nigerian must read is things fall apart. when I was younger I hated reading books that didn’t have pictures until I read things fall apart. my imagination was running wild. I enjoyed that book so much.one of the best books ever written. I have read things fall apart 3 times. (thats a huge record for me)

    half of a yellow sun is also interesting and funny. I am yet to finish it tho.

  5. Adesuwa

    August 10, 2015 at 4:17 pm

    Thank you, this was really helpful.

  6. Sayo

    August 10, 2015 at 4:27 pm

    Awww, this is the second post I’m reading about books today.

    Tuke Morgan spoke about the importance of reading in her lessons I’ve learnt as a creative entrepreneur vlog series. She is giving away a book she just read, maybe this is a sign that I should enter the giveaway.

    The only books I’ve read on this list are secret lives of Baba Segi’s wives and Half of a yellow sun. I think The Spider King’s Daughter by Chibundu Onuzo should be on the list too.

  7. Moyo

    August 10, 2015 at 4:30 pm

    Great list of books, I have read 5 of these books, Ake is my favorite, I will get my older children to read Ake and things fall apart. we need to take a break from social media and the internet . We need to start encouraging our young ones to read by setting up book clubs in the neighbourhood where they can borrow books to read if they cant afford to buy.

  8. mrs chidukane

    August 10, 2015 at 4:30 pm

    I read and loved Buchi Emecheta’s Second Class Citizen. Amazing read. Very apt for women who are thinking about marrying men they will take abroad or Lekki husbands,lol. There are so many Biafra books but I strongly recommend Half of a yellow sun to every Nigerian especially these young Igbo people being misled by that foolish Director. The indignities of war were so clearly described in that book. I think Chmamanda is the best author I have read in a very long while.

    • Blessedheart

      August 11, 2015 at 10:24 am

      I loved Second Class Citizen. I’ve read and enjoyed most of the books on this list. Does anyone know where I can get Efuru? I’ve been looking to read that book again. The Concubine should also be on that list. Arrow of God by Chinua Achebe is also a good one.

    • Cocolette

      August 11, 2015 at 12:40 pm

      I have Efuru n can lend you if you’re in Lagos. Email [email protected]. but u will return o, m keeping for my children’s children as my mum did for me

    • Anonymous Aboki

      August 11, 2015 at 6:51 pm

      On Biafra/Civil War, what are your thoughts on Isidore Okpewho’s Last Duty?

  9. blueberry

    August 10, 2015 at 4:33 pm

    Great tips. I have read most of them too, but i am always open to new suggestions. I am a fan of African literature. Its just epic. Another really good one is:
    I do not come to you by chance

  10. Ocean Beauty

    August 10, 2015 at 4:44 pm

    So I am not as stupid as I thought I was. I have read more than half of those books. To think I just finished reading Efuru a few weeks ago.
    Time to search for the other books.

  11. Anon

    August 10, 2015 at 4:44 pm

    Ola Rotimi – The Gods Are Not to Blame – King Adetusa, Odewale, Ojuola. The plot, the sub-plots and serves as an insight into the Yoruba kingdom/culture.
    Ovonramven Nogbaisi (true story. He was one of the greatest Bini Obas and gave the colonialists a tough time. He was a warrior and was sent on exile)
    Ola Rotimi wrote beautiful plays. I found them easy to read and he used simple language. Others are Kurunmi and Our husband has gone mad again,

    Wole Soyinka – Kongi’s Harvest, The Lion and the Jewel, Death and the King’s Horseman (a true story of British colonial Nigeria.) To understand his greatness, please read a lot of his books (leave his politics aside.)

    Amos Tutuola – The Palm Wine Drinkard (a man’s addiction to palm wine. A good use of pidgin English was prominent in this book.)

    Elechi Amadi – The Concubine. ( a black widow sort of story.)

    Ben Okri – The famished road. (an ogbanje/abiku story.)

    Cyprian Ekwensi – Jagua Nana (a married woman who became a prostitute) and its sequel Jagua Nana’s daughter.

    Outside of our Nigerian writers –
    Weep not child (Ngugi W. T.) Another colonial account in Kenya.

    The Beautyful Ones Are Not Yet Born (Kwei Armah) – a good insight into Ghana during and post-Kwame Nkrumah.

    Ali Mazrui – wrote a lot of political books on Africa and Islam. Soldiers and Kinsmen in Uganda, Afro-Arabs.

    Manzoor Moghal – Idi Amin Lion of Africa (it tells its own story from the name. Dictatorship.)

    • Wale

      August 10, 2015 at 5:42 pm

      Thank YOU! I see you have really good taste in books. I will even add the long walk to freedom-the Mandela autobiography(for me probably the best human story I have ever read)weep not child by ngugi wa thongi;Africa betrayed by George ayitteh;the tragedy of victory by Alabi isama-to the me so far the best documentation of the Biafran war by someone who played a major war front role(a unique insider perspectitive). Almost all books by Soyinka and Achebe.
      D.O. fagunwa’s oboju ode ni Igbo erumule-this is a solid book written in Yoruba.
      I am still one of a very small group of people that feel chindama is way overrated. Good, but over-hyped. Are there no northern authors and good books from the north? So many books from African authors for a broader perspective of the African experience. My current focus now are African classic and modern writers.

    • Rue

      August 10, 2015 at 7:45 pm

      A lot of northern literature predate colonial nigeria and are mostly written in ajami or arabic. But you can try zainab alkali’s still born. She is one of the first female authours in the country and a beautiful story teller too. By the way Achebe’s “A man of the people” is one of my favs. It is a beautifully written satire about post indepence nigerian politics.

    • Anon

      August 10, 2015 at 7:58 pm

      Wale – you are welcome. I was going to add Mandela’s book. I have goose bumps as I’m typing this because of that book. A great read and you need a dictionary while reading.

      Touche re-Chimanda. We have been blessed with great writers.

      From the North, political books by Yusuf Bala Usman are good. The manipulation of religion in Nigeria.
      Nasir B. Zahradeen wrote on Maitasine.
      Aliyu Akilu
      Dan Fulani.

      Isidore Okpewho – The victims
      Ken Saro-Wiwa – Soza boy, Basi and Company (yes, it was book)
      Duro Ladipo – Oba ko so (the story of sango.)

      Fagunwa was a great man. UNILAG named a hall after him.

    • Peyton

      August 10, 2015 at 10:24 pm

      Witness to tears by Abubakar Gimba I hope am correct. Interesting book. Good storyline. The passport of Mallam Illia. The mysterious Ebony Carver. The wives revolt. Anthills of the. Savannah by Chinua Ache be. Dizzy Angel that story about the ogbanje girl. Then the pacesetters collection.

    • whocares

      August 10, 2015 at 5:46 pm

      Trials of brother Jero is probably my fav Wole Soyinka book. I know most people dont like it, but I loved it.. Your recommendations – *love struck* *skips to amazon, and then skips back when she spied the price of some of them*

    • Mz Socially Awkward...

      August 10, 2015 at 5:59 pm

      Hahahaha! That’s what I’m saying! And this is why I’m tryna filch my mother’s copies (mainly because she’s got a lot of 1st editions)…

    • Ifeoma

      August 11, 2015 at 9:40 am

      Yeah, Trials of Brother Jero is a comic satire that every Nigerian should read. It’s amazing how the issues Soyinka presents in that play are still being portrayed in our modern day society.

    • Mz Socially Awkward...

      August 10, 2015 at 5:56 pm

      Flora Nwapa, Buchi Emecheta and Ngugi wa Thiongo – my mother’s three literary heroines (Simone de Beauvoir and Betty Friedan follow very closely behind) and whose works in her library opened my eyes to how African female writers raised their own unique banner of feminism through fiction.

      “The Gods are not to blame” and “Ovaranwem Nogbaisi” – pure classics. Both plays paint a very good picture of the pre-colonial Benin kingdom.

      “Death and the Kings’ Horsemen”!!! – I agree with you that once you cast Wole’s current politicking aside, his earlier works will immerse you.

      Elechi Amadi and Ben Okri – I’m still trying to get another copy of “The Famished Road” from naija… actually, I’m trying to steal my mother’s copy but she no go gree… both named men are accomplished writers with books that should be kept on the reading list of generations of Nigerians to come.

      “Jagua Nana” and “Jagua Nana’s Daughter” – so, I read those two books when I was definitely too young to be reading them (especially with the sexual content … actually, a lot of African literature from that era had some kain sexually open writing) and so I think I need to read them again with renewed understanding. Especially since Cyprian Ekwensi took on the unique position at the time of being a male writer telling stories from the perspective of two women…

      Ayi Kwei Armah – She and Ama Ata Aidoo are both talented Ghanaian women with some great writing between them.

      Other Nigerian writers, with works relevant to our history/identity:-
      JP Clark’s “Casualties” and “State of the Union” – poems with some thought provoking messages about where we’ve come from.
      Gabriel Okara’s writings – mainly poetry focused on the Nigerian identity in post-colonial times.
      Ken Saro-Wiwa’s “On a Darkling plain: An account of the Nigerian Civil War” and “Genocide in Nigeria: The Ogoni Tragedy” – I recommend the second one more especially as I’ve shockingly found that there were many people living in Lagos at the time who had no idea of all the chaos happening in the Niger Delta during the late 90s. Heck, plenty of people in the south didn’t seem to have a clue either… Ken Saro-Wiwa may have been a controversial man but he fought hard against the injustices carried out against riverine communities. “Sozaboy” and “A Forest of Flowers” are also good reads from him.
      Chimeka Garrick’s “Tomorrow Died Yesterday” – and following on from the above, this book is another recommendation to anyone who wants to understand (albeit through fiction) the politics of piracy in the Niger Delta.

      Nigerian literature has some correct gems. African literature on the whole can be completely captivating to read.

    • Koffie

      August 10, 2015 at 7:42 pm

      Awwww, someone else enjoyed JP Clark’s The Casualties. That poem has a special place in my heart and I won a prize back then for reciting/playing it out. The Casualties also marked the beginning of the Koffie I am now, lool I used it to set my Arts class free from the stereotype that had reigned in my school about Arts students. lol, memories

    • Iris

      August 10, 2015 at 7:45 pm

      I was just about to ask why Tomorrow Died Yesterday was not on this list. It was a fantastic, absolutely fantastic read. The older books are great and paved the way for younger authors but I think Chimeka Garricks is definitely one to watch. Personally I think he’s up there with Chimamanda. I could go on and on about that book, lol. There was something to love about all the major characters, flawed as they were but Kaniye was my favorite by far.

    • Ello Bae

      August 10, 2015 at 8:00 pm

      Mz Socially Awkward!!! I feel like I know you!:) Your writing style, expressions, childhood memories are so so familiar. Everytime I read your posts, it seems like I’m reading something I wrote/ experienced. Two things…You either grew up in PH or went to an FGGC school…or maybe both. Your story about Jaguar Nana’s Daughter did it for me. I was having the same thoughts reading this article and then BOOM! I saw your comment. Had to be Mz Socially Awkward!

    • Anon

      August 10, 2015 at 8:25 pm

      Mz Socially Awkward – nwanyi oma! Great comment. I was in awe of Ken Saro-Wiwa and Chinua Achebe. They were in the same secondary school with my Dad. Can you imagine these men strolling into my house and at such a young age my jaw always dropped. I had the same effect when Soyinka used to come and give lectures at SOAS. The man is charismatic among other things. Another one where you need your thinking cap on when reading his books and a dictionary when listening to him. I went back to read all these books as an adult, much better than when I read them in secondary school. My Dad has a library of various books, mostly signed copies and you dare not take them away without returning them..

    • Mz Socially Awkward...

      August 10, 2015 at 11:11 pm

      @Koffie, I see we emerged from the same generation of students. ? Hoping JP Clark and co. still form part of required secondary school reading.

      @Iris, that Chimeka has just refused to toot his horn enough because I’m constantly having to press my copy of his book into people’s hands that haven’t heard of him. And I agree with you – the beauty if what Chinamanda does is to draw the writer in with descriptive prose which makes you watch the story unravel in your mind and Chimeka does the same thing in his own way. Actually, I might just might read that book again…

      @Ello Bae, “yes!” to both questions.. ? If you’re on Twitter, “plix” drop me a message – @1Lifesaved so I out myself. ? Or else, if you’ve got an email address you want to share, that’ll be great too

      @Anon, nne, I’m jelox. Chinua and Ken were just sharing knowledge (and, possibly, bowls of nkwobi) in your parlour and you no give them books to sign? Why na? Your dad must be in the academic circle as well, no?

    • TA

      August 11, 2015 at 4:52 pm

      @ Mz SA, you see why I love you? You have read all the books I have so its no wonder i’m in love with your virtual spirit. Lol . I moved house a few weeks ago and lost my copy of Saro Wiwa’s ‘Forest of Flowers and I have been in mourning…Please who can help me out? Okadabooks is not there yet. Sadly.

    • Anonymous Aboki

      August 11, 2015 at 6:54 pm

      Yup, Chimeka Garrick is definitely king!

    • Mz Socially Awkward...

      August 12, 2015 at 3:35 pm

      @TA, virtual sis! 😀 Biko, draw nearer, let’s hug in the spirit… (why the heck isn’t there a PC emoticon for hugs??)

      @Anonymous Aboki, all of us fans need to start needling him about doing all those book signing ‘sturvs’ and tours. Brother should be getting out more!

    • Diuto

      August 23, 2015 at 2:29 pm

      Awww….Lemme famz a lil bit. I grew up with Saro Wiwa’s sis. Her daughter was my age mate. She’s a renowned lawyer

    • Idomagirl

      August 14, 2015 at 9:31 pm

      I am currently reading The Palmwine Drinkard (I’ve read it a million times lol)

      The Gods Are Not To Blame is one of my faves as. You have great taste in books.

  12. Blackbeauty

    August 10, 2015 at 4:48 pm

    You have inspired me to go and look for Sefi Ata’s books. Haven’t read any.
    I would add to your list Elechi Amadi’s – The Concubine. Like TFA, I have read that book a couple of times.

  13. Person

    August 10, 2015 at 4:53 pm

    Others:
    1. You Must Set Forth at Dawn, Wole Soyinka
    2. Nzeogwu, Olusegun Obasanjo
    3. Nine Lives, El Nukoya
    4. Foreign Gods Inc, Okey Ndibe
    5. Emeka, Frederick Forsyth
    6. Why We Struck, Adewale Ademoyega
    7. Daughters Who Walk This Path: Yejide Kilanko

    • Mz Socially Awkward...

      August 10, 2015 at 6:10 pm

      In fact ehn, as I finished typing my above comment, I started thinking of non-fiction (I’m clearly in literary heaven with this post) and “Nzeogwu” was another book I read when I was too young to really assimilate a lot of things written there. What it did, however, was fascinate me to the point of wanting to read more about the various coups that happened between the 60s-70s and I started hunting out more autobiographies and biographies written by the military men of that era. Sadly, I cannot remember the other titles but I remember how well strategized and matter-of-fact each takeover would be described and how it seemed even more interesting because it was real events.

      The sad thing is that a lot of those military men’s auto-biographies and biographies haven’t been republished after their first editions and are likely not easily found in the market anymore but if you can get your hands on them, you’ll find really great and actual history there.

    • Person

      August 10, 2015 at 10:03 pm

      My father is an avid reader. I am hoping to inherit his library, but I suspect I will have to fight two of my other siblings for dem books. 😀

    • Meah

      August 11, 2015 at 5:49 pm

      @person: I love nine lives!! You are actually the only other person i know (no pun intended) who has read that book. Imagine my shock and pleasure! I dont even know it was about the book but it got me from the very first page till i got to the last page by 3am…

    • Anonymous Aboki

      August 11, 2015 at 6:57 pm

      So, that your joy might be full, I’ve read it too, lol..

  14. ijeli

    August 10, 2015 at 5:01 pm

    I couldn’t finish half of a yellow sun……I just couldn’t , my emotions wouldn’t let me

    • mgtss.blogspot.com

      August 10, 2015 at 8:13 pm

      Me too 🙁

  15. ladybird

    August 10, 2015 at 5:05 pm

    When I was in my early teens I chanced upon Chimanada ‘ s HOYS which had been in a book shelve at home for a long time… I wasn’t a prolific reader at that time n I’m not Nigerian either but I found the book so interesting so I finished it quickly.. It got me interested in other African literature books. I’ve read Things Fall Apart too..In high school and also for a college course. It is equally interesting with a lot to learn from the characters and plot. Thanks for the list. I’ll definitely check out the books.

  16. Chiamaka

    August 10, 2015 at 5:42 pm

    Wow, this post just took me down memory lane. I read Efuru and The Joys of Motherhood countless times and thinking of the storyline has just made my smile so wide. Sometimes good and timeless books like these two favorites have way of speaking directly to the heart and effortlessly transporting one to the scene of the stories. Now let me go and stock up on the other recommended ones. Thanks AfricanBadGirl..

  17. whocares

    August 10, 2015 at 5:42 pm

    I have been trolling the internet for “Second chance”. I read this book in secondary school and boy I must have a copy. It is on my to do list, when I go to Nigeria, I will hunt it down. The African Child by Cameron Laye I enjoyed that immensely as well. Loved Ake, it reminds me of “my father’s daughter” and also “my mother’s son? ” I cannot bring myself to read half of a yellow sun yet. Its an insane fear. I am worried I might not like it as much as I liked Purple Hibiscus. Boy, did I love that book. Nervous Condition is also another amazing book. Its the sequel to (I cannot remember the title).. I also cannot bring myself to read Americanah completely either. Ohh this book its by a Jamaican (?) author. I always forget the title so you will be doing me a good turn if anyone has read it, kindly tell me the name. The setting was a Jamaican (?) village. It followed the life of everyone there from the woman who snatched husbands, to the fake pastor who somehow manipulated the villagers terribly and ended up killing the richest man in the village (does it ring a bell?) its a gorgeous book. Also, “in the castle of my skin”.. I will stop now. I am sorry I do not have titles. I can barely remember the names. Ooh “Go tell it on the mountain” and the “polished Hoe”. I wil honestly stop now.
    The Secret lives of baba segi’s wives,. LOOL. Ahh that book was comedy. lool.. And thank you for these other recommendations. 4 more books to buy.!!!!

    • Yabby

      August 10, 2015 at 9:17 pm

      Read second chance as a literature novel in secondary school too. Really loved it. Speaking of reading, I just read an informative Article here on BN about the ebola salt rumours, as the writer pointed out many ppl, myself inclusive wld not have Fallen victim to salt rumours if we had read more.

    • Peyton

      August 10, 2015 at 10:33 pm

      Go tell it on the mountain by James Baldwin. And the fire next time. There are adult themed scenes in Go tell it on the mountain

  18. Raddy

    August 10, 2015 at 5:53 pm

    The concubine was a good book… assin ehn

  19. Jice

    August 10, 2015 at 6:00 pm

    Love this write up and love these books (except one of them). Hopefully I’ll join the list of ‘African writers’ one day.. wish me luck y’all!

  20. Ihuoma

    August 10, 2015 at 6:03 pm

    Read 6 out of 10! *feeling proud*. Back then i used to read like the books were going out of season, before boys and instagram came and confused somebody * side eyes at myself*????

  21. Ihuoma

    August 10, 2015 at 6:06 pm

    Oh! Before i forget please add Triumph of the Waterlily by Ify Osammor to this list. It is an amazing book. If you have a kindle mobile or tab, you can get it of Amazon for next to nothing!

    • whocares

      August 10, 2015 at 8:12 pm

      YES!!!! That book. I was just about to comment on it, and then I googled and bam it was on amazon. Its relatively new to amazon and at such cheap prices. Only last year I checked and nothing. I have kuku bought a copy sha.

  22. BB

    August 10, 2015 at 6:06 pm

    Good reads
    I Do Not Come to You by Chance by Adaobi Tricia Nwaubani
    A Time to Heal by Seye Oke
    The Icarus Girl by Helen Oyeyemi

    The thing around her neck by Chimamanda Adichie is also a fun book to read

    Regards

    • Ello second bae

      August 10, 2015 at 8:28 pm

      I thought I do not come to you by chance was good but isnt great. I found it interesting

    • Folake

      August 11, 2015 at 8:00 am

      The Icarus Girl was chilling! Helen Oyeyemi is a fantastic author.

  23. NigerianAmericanGirl1

    August 10, 2015 at 6:37 pm

    Wow, this is a great list. Thanks a lot BN!

    The only reading requirement we have here in the U.S. is Things Fall Apart. (secondary school/high school). Everyone’s read that book. 🙂

    I got introduced to Chimamanda Ngozi- Adichie while in college for undergrad. First book I read was Purple Hibiscus. I have been hooked to her writing ever since. Americannah was amazing too. So much truth in that book. – read it 4 times. lol Excited for the movie to come out hopefully sometime next year.

    Going to see if I can get my hands on some of these books listed in the comments section. Hoping to find them on Amazon. If not, I’ll wait until I travel to Nigeria to find them.

    Biko, are there any major bookstores in Naija? Thanks in advance!

    • mgtss.blogspot.com

      August 10, 2015 at 8:17 pm

      I loved Americannah 🙂

    • Dr.N

      August 11, 2015 at 12:03 am

      Laterna ventures. They also deliver

    • Anonymous Aboki

      August 11, 2015 at 7:02 pm

      Patabah, Surulere is my ‘hood…they carry autographed copies too..

  24. Nike Akande

    August 10, 2015 at 6:37 pm

    I read two very interesting books written by Ebi Akpeti titled God Has a Sense of Humour and The Perfect Church. If you ask me, she is the best Nigerian author. You don’t get bored when you read her stories and you grasp the message. Very good read.

  25. nwanyi na aga aga

    August 10, 2015 at 6:49 pm

    Chai! The books I read growing up..I ticked off the African Writers series step by step.. To add to the list above for those who would like a knowledge of the early African political scene.. Peter Abraham’s – Mine Boy,
    Kenneth Kaunda- Zambia shall be free,
    Cyprian Ekwensi – People of the City,
    Tim Aluko – One man, one wife and One man , One matchet,
    Ngugi Wa thongo – The River between and The Black hermit,
    John Muonye – Obi and The Only Son,
    Flora Nwapa – Idu,
    Achebe’s – Girls at war is interesting too, Elechi Amadi’s – Sunset in Biafra.
    Who remembers the Pacesetter series at the time, I think Macmillan published it then or so Ebvu my love – Helen Obiagele,
    The Money doublers by Maurice,
    Rich girl Poor Boy – Osayin,
    Too young to Die,
    Tear drops at sunset – Richard Akoji..
    .These books shaped my life shaa, then came the mills and boon..loool! the hearts, the James Hadley Chase series.! when I entered uni I shaa left African novels and moved to big oyibo novels, there was a certain coolness that people viewed you with if you had the Mario Puzo, Agatha Christie, John Buchans, P.D James crime novels under your lecture note, it could be likened to using an iphone6 now..looool! After leaving school and starting the real hustle my reading culture disappeared..Now after work I come and read everything on bellanaija, sdk, weddingdigest, download series movies and go home *sobs* I bought two new novels since last year October and I have not even finished reading them as beautiful as they re..They lie untouched on my shelf..This post brought a whole lot of memories back chai! I never knew a day would come and I would not have read anything for a full year..

    • whocares

      August 10, 2015 at 8:16 pm

      OMG. Evbu my love!!!! and I loved the pacesetters. I know what you mean about losing the ability to read for a while. When I started my job, I couldn’t read for pleasure and that was a side effect of the job. But now, i’m back on that reading train. Don’t worry, you will find your reading mojo again. I always have a book in my bag no matter where I go. Too many times I have forgotten my travel card at home but never my book. lol.
      Ahh this feature is my happy place. Can I marry everyone that has commented here? Don’t worry, we can make it work 😉

    • Wale

      August 10, 2015 at 11:14 pm

      I think i managed to read all the pacesetter books and was sent these books here in the states before my parents banned them. There is something about Naija love stories. Of course we won’t have done justice to this thread without mentioning julius Cesar Shakespeare, tales of Canterbury etc and, all the Charles Dickson and jane eyre books.
      It seems all regular commentators on BN are true book lovers-not surprised. I look forward to reading all the new suggestions I discovered today.
      Ah! I remember famous five and the other one?? Secret seven???? not sure. Can’t remember the name now-that started my love of books.
      BN- we should start an online book club-select a day for us to meet on this forum.
      Expand minds y’all!

    • Anonymous Aboki

      August 11, 2015 at 7:06 pm

      Wale, are you sure? There about 130 books in the Pace Setters series..if you did read all of them, maximum respect. Of which, I’ve noticed a “resurgence” of ’em Pace Setters books sef, cool stuff..

    • Blackbeauty

      August 10, 2015 at 8:52 pm

      I too used to be such a voracious reader. Read my first Sheldon in primary three, got inspired to write detective novels by Agatha Christie at age 7…lol. I could finish a James Patterson novel in one night. Sigh! I haven’t read a new book this year. How will I teach my kids to read if I have stopped doing so myself?

    • Mz Socially Awkward...

      August 10, 2015 at 11:34 pm

      [taking the discussion on a brief detour]
      Don’t worry, your real lows in reading culture as an adult is when Hollywood franchises cause you to suddenly pick up copies of tween-fiction.

      Was ambling along the aisles in Costco two years ago and they had one nice deal on “The Hunger” games trilogy, all three for £6.99 so I decided to buy them for a lark. Thinking I’d gift it as a joke for someone’s Secret Santa or something… Na im I take mistake open the first one. Don’t think I slept that night oh and that’s how the madness started. Finished the entire set in mere days and honestly couldn’t believe my own self after having the entire “Girl with a dragon tattoo” series sitting unopened on my shelf for three years now ?? – seriously, though, reading “Hunger Games” at this advanced age? *sideeyes to myself*

      Then…. It happened again last year when I visited Costco and they were doing a deal on the “Maze Runner” set of books. ?? Devoured them in days, again. Why???!!! I can only blame Hollywood and shall continue to thank God that nothing similar ever compelled me to gravitate towards the “Twilight” book series when they were trending hotly. And so far, I’ve destroyed any impulse to pick up a copy of “The Fault in our stars”… *still sideeying myself in disgust*

    • Mz Socially Awkward...

      August 10, 2015 at 11:37 pm

      Edits –
      “The Hunger Games” trilogy
      “Girl with The Dragon Tattoo”.

    • whocares

      August 11, 2015 at 9:34 am

      @MSA- Team hunger game, artemis fowl (I know, I know but I actually enjoyed them), twilight (deep shame here), maze runner, divergent, and other teen books reporting for duty here. The other day I was reading an Enid Bylton book (the wishing tree) on the train. loool. Heck, I even read Naruto manga.. I cant help it. I worked in a library for a while so the students at the college used to push all manner of books on me. They know I have no loyalty books wise so I read them all. Once you start, #itsallover. Only book that has defeated me is fifty shades of grey.. stopped at page 70. I have never looked back since then. I like my smuts to be just that- smuts. But dont try to hide iranu behind the “fiction novel facade” (sorry for the digression o) lol

    • Dr.N

      August 11, 2015 at 12:04 am

      Go & sin no more
      Now buy a book tomorrow and read 1 chapter a day
      E hugs

    • nwanyi na aga aga

      August 11, 2015 at 6:18 pm

      Doc I am going with my head bowed down to start reading again.. See Ms SA and whocares they are still very strong on their grind. Chai! I envy you guys spirit o. I don’t think I have read any modern (2014-2015) book, the only partial modern e- books i read is the Khaleed Hosseini’s series on the wars.Imagine when I saw the shades of grey and heard trilogy, I simply wakad left I didn’t even bother, that is how low my spirit has become. Lol! @whocares But dont try to hide iranu behind the “fiction novel facade”

    • Anonymous Aboki

      August 11, 2015 at 7:09 pm

      Ah, Khaled Hosseini is *sighs* He’s in the same realm as Paulo Coelho..

    • Fiction Lover

      December 9, 2015 at 1:51 pm

      I used to love books and reading fiction a lot but like you other things have taken over and become more interesting like the internet and SERIES. But I am working hard at getting my reading game back. I’m not really into Nigerian writers but I like Things fall apart and Half of A yellow Sun.

  26. molarah

    August 10, 2015 at 7:03 pm

    “If it did not make too much sense to you then, please dig it out of your pile of old books, dust it clean and re-read.”

    Yup! I did this, and “Things Fall Apart” was definitely worth the re-read. I saw things in a much different perspective, and its really an insightful read.

  27. Ms_Oyinkansola

    August 10, 2015 at 7:04 pm

    Efuru is it!!!! I read that book over ten times as a child. ( i fell in love with reading novels as a vry little girl and my mama helped grow the seed). good books. read some. now looking for the rest. let me add, the river between – Ngugi wa thiong’ o, the old man and the medal – Ferdinand Oyono and …. (i’ll add the last one soon, its hiding somewhere)

  28. EllesarisEllendil

    August 10, 2015 at 7:24 pm

    Since everybody has the fiction covered, I’ll recommend, Guns Germs and Steel and UNESCO general’s history of Africa as my top non-fiction reads.

    • Anonymous Aboki

      August 11, 2015 at 7:12 pm

      This is the 2nd recommendation of “Guns, Germs and Steel” I’m coming across; Double F made the 1st. Just added it to “Potential”, thanks..

  29. babygiwa

    August 10, 2015 at 7:35 pm

    I think I am going to cry. Best post ever! I have read eight books from your list. Two more books to get.
    For those on twitter, you can join @thereadclub by following them and tweeting your email add at them. It is a community of readers on twitter NG, they send books to your email and you read and discuss on Fridays with the hashtag #thereadclub We are reading 50 books in 2015 and so far so good!
    Reading is cool. Teach your child to read.
    Xoxo

    • Dr.N

      August 11, 2015 at 12:05 am

      Off to join. Thanks

    • Koffie

      August 11, 2015 at 9:22 am

      The book club sent me a non-fiction book almost immediately. I’m sure I’ll drag on this one. Thanks

    • Lala

      August 11, 2015 at 3:20 pm

      Thanks, just joined.

  30. Koffie

    August 10, 2015 at 7:46 pm

    The Joys of Motherhood, Abiku and Things Fall Apart were books I read over and over. There’s also 1984, though people would argue it’s a boring book but it’s one with a very captivating concept. I’ll search for some of the ones mentioned here. Great post

    • Anonymous Aboki

      August 11, 2015 at 7:14 pm

      Lol, Orwell is boring pls…

    • Wale

      August 11, 2015 at 10:00 pm

      They didn’t have 130 pacesetter titles during my time. Maybe newer ones have been written since- I am talking 19..! Unless I missed some since they stopped sending them to me back then. I don’t think I would want to catch up though. We were innocent back then, things have changed and we’ve experienced love for real-no more fantasies.

    • Koffie

      August 14, 2015 at 2:44 pm

      You know the thing about foods to you and poison to another…

  31. fob

    August 10, 2015 at 7:51 pm

    unting me… I simply need to read it again but I can remember the title or author. I can recall the story line which goes like this. Ibiwari is a beautiful woman who gives birth to a son. The novel covers igbo traditions on the naming ceremonies. There is an old woman who is known for her love for folklore tales. The boy grows up goes to school and becomes a scholar. He falls in love with a girl from the osu caste and their love is forbidden. The girls name is Ugonwa. She sells groundnut.
    Biko does this book sound familiar to anyone. Help a girl out.. I don Google tire.

    • Hadassah

      August 12, 2015 at 7:41 pm

      I think you mean “Sounds of War” by Chidera Duru

  32. fob

    August 10, 2015 at 7:53 pm

    So this book has been haunting me… I read it as a child and I simply need to read it again but I can’t remember the title or author. I can recall this much from the story line which goes like this: Ibiwari is a beautiful woman who gives birth to a son. The novel covers igbo traditions on the naming ceremonies. There is an old woman who is known for her love for folklore tales. The boy grows up goes to school and becomes a scholar. He falls in love with a girl from the osu caste and their love is forbidden. The girls name is Ugonwa. She sells groundnut.
    Biko does this book sound familiar to anyone. Help a girl out.. I don Google tire.

  33. demashi

    August 10, 2015 at 7:53 pm

    HOYS was a great read full of humour and sexual innuendo’s. It actually made me appreciate the Igbo people more and elevated Ojukwu to GOD-like status in my eyes. I believe they were fighting for a just cause at that time. Read Jude Dibia’s (who used to be my wife’s boss way back) book and it evokes some emotion – although the theme is not acceptable in our culture, his style of writing is impressive. I need to check up on the others.

  34. meemee

    August 10, 2015 at 7:58 pm

    Another interesting book to read is the godfather never sleeps by J.k. Randle..u go laugh tire …naija politics no be today

    • Anonymous Aboki

      August 11, 2015 at 7:16 pm

      You should read “How To Be A Nigerian” by Peter Enahoro, since you like laughing & politics…

  35. Joy

    August 10, 2015 at 8:11 pm

    Efuru by Flora Nwapa has to be one of the best books I have ever read. Who can forget the troublesome Ajanaku? Also Toads for supper by Chukwuemeka Ike should definitely be on this list!

    • Tydo

      August 10, 2015 at 9:44 pm

      ‘Potters Wheel’ by Chukwuemeka Ike was also a good read.

    • Blessedheart

      August 11, 2015 at 10:31 am

      Bottled Leopard by Chukwuemeka Ike also.

  36. kehinde

    August 10, 2015 at 8:39 pm

    Only read joys of motherhood.. Very nice….will love to read the rest

  37. Koffie

    August 10, 2015 at 9:59 pm

    Half of a yellow sun is a book I really want to read but since I’ve not done much reading of non-fiction on the Biafran war, I’m afraid I’ll be reading a biased account from Chimamanda. I watched the movie though but I’m sure it doesn’t do the book justice. I taught ‘Purple Hibiscus’ to literature students in a secondary school last year and I know Chimamanda has depth. I’ll read history and then do the HoaYS leap.
    Who read “For their tomorrow, we gave our Today”? I read that (Non-fiction) as a junior student from my mum’s Philosophy library and even then, I was impressed but I should read it again now that my mind is erm sharper.
    @Babygiwa, I’m going to give your book club a try. Thanks

  38. Pat

    August 10, 2015 at 10:09 pm

    Bella naija is simply the place to be. I’m still a growing girl, so I haven’t read all yet. I sure will! however this is the most matured and educative blog I know so far…..am now inspired to one day submit an academic excellence article. thank you BN! ur helping be a perfect teen.

  39. mabel

    August 10, 2015 at 10:20 pm

    I’ve read 3 out of all 10. Guess I’ll go book searching. Lol. Please add the following very interesting books to your list. Purple hibiscus by Chimamanda Adichie, The souls of black folk by Du Bois, Divided we stand by Cyprian Ekwensi, A woman of substance, To be the best by Babara Taylor Bradford. African child by Camara Laye. Star by Danielle Steel. How Europe underdeveloped Africa by Walter Rodney. For pacesetters I remember For Mbatha and Rebecca. Please also add Pushkin’s and Dostayevsky’s books to your list. Lol. I’ve tried finishing Obama’s Dreams of my father since the day my dad gave the book to me but for where

    • Anonymous Aboki

      August 11, 2015 at 7:21 pm

      You really should finish Bammy’s book – they helped offset his student loans, lol…& there’s also that story-within-story of how his Grand Dad sliced the head off someone’s goat with one masterful stroke because the thing walked across his farm or something. I was like, see Achebe’s Okonkwo o & Ikemefuna..

    • Hadassah

      August 12, 2015 at 6:48 am

      @Anonymous Aboki please what’s the title of the ‘Bammy’s Book”?

    • Mz Socially Awkward...

      August 12, 2015 at 3:41 pm

      @Hadassah, I think he means Obama’s memoir – “Dreams of my father”.

  40. Chibugo

    August 10, 2015 at 10:20 pm

    It appears I’ve read all but two of these books. Chai! My love for books. Achebe, Soyinka, Camara Laye, Ngugi,Nwapa, Chukwuemeka Ike,Elechi Amadi, and recently, Sefi Atta, Adichie,Teju cole, Buchi Emencheta, Stella Osammor, Lord! I can’t name them all. These were my nannies while growing up. And they did a good job of it, if I might add. Thank God for having a bookshop owner for a dad. Made me take reading for granted. Books are a great gift to humankind, truly.

    • Nelson

      January 3, 2016 at 4:26 pm

      Please, my good brothers and sisters, how can I access these books online? I have searched and seem to find just a few. Maybe my search method is not effective, I don’t know. Wouldn’t mind if anyone can help out with softcopies, please. My Email: udoasuquo(at)gmail.com. Thank you

    • Stella Osammor

      March 23, 2020 at 4:09 pm

      Hi, I am a publisher for Stella Osammor. I came across your comment. Thanks for the kind words. You can follow her latest work on Delta Maria Books or Okadabooks. And feel free to reach out to her. She will be glad to hear from you. 😉

  41. kemi

    August 10, 2015 at 10:48 pm

    the secret wives of baba segi is so funny. I laughed throughout the whole book.lol Will have to buy the book. Worth the read!

  42. Estelle

    August 10, 2015 at 10:51 pm

    U won’t believe it. I feel like having all does books mentioned in d post and comments in my library. I have only read a few and I feel left you out. Thanks guys for the names, I will by any one I come across.

  43. Funmilola

    August 10, 2015 at 11:16 pm

    You see elechi amadi’s book titled the concubine ba,I can’t count how many times I’ve read it and still do…….that book ehn!
    African literature writers rock!

  44. Dr.N

    August 11, 2015 at 12:10 am

    Without a silver spoon by Eddie Iroh
    Christian novels of which Frank Perretti’s Piercing the Darkness and also Redeeming Love are my favourite
    I loved Efuru, Passport of Mallam Illi! Concubine, So long a Letter, Weep not Child…
    Too many to mention
    How I love d smell of new books

    • TA

      August 11, 2015 at 8:10 am

      Me too! The smell of a new book is oddly intoxicating …in a good way. 🙂

    • Blessedheart

      August 11, 2015 at 10:32 am

      I felt something funny in my belly seeing these titles. Wow.

    • Anonymous Aboki

      August 11, 2015 at 7:25 pm

      I see why you recommended Laterna Dr. N, Christian Lit. Francine Rivers’ Lineage of Grace is the best book in that Christian Lit. genre, I shed a tear at Tamar going back home, in tears with her maid/nanny, after her maltreatment at the hands Judah & his sons, kai..

    • Mz Socially Awkward...

      August 12, 2015 at 3:47 pm

      *pulls up a seat* There’s something that I can’t really get into, with Francine Rivers’ books. Only read one a very long time ago (can’t even remember the name but it was quite popular about 10 years ago) and it felt so… depressing. So much emotion being described that I still remember the pain of the characters even if I can’t remember their names (actually, the book might have had something to do with a sin offering… or a guilt offering… or something from the past hanging over a family’s legacy… it was sha very deep). Have refused to read another one since then but so many people I know are enthusiastic fans.

      Maybe I should try again?

  45. OmogeNaija

    August 11, 2015 at 12:16 am

    I have read a few of the books listed
    Infact, I bought another copy of Things Fall Aprt shorlty after the author passed on, this time around, I read it in less than 48 hours whilst doing a full time job.

    Why in the heavens is African Child not on your list, what of The River Between by Ngugi Wa Thiongo? I have a copy that is about 30yrs old with me

    I figure out many of us read those books when we were in primary or secondary school, I suggest you read them all over again and I proise you will understand better and gain new perspective.

  46. wizzy

    August 11, 2015 at 12:50 am

    The. Bottled leopard by chukwuemeka Ike and Without a silver spoon made my childhood. Any book by chimamanda, Achebe or Soyinka is legendary.

    • Amy

      August 11, 2015 at 3:48 pm

      the bottled leopard!! i enjoyed that one

  47. chi-e-z

    August 11, 2015 at 12:55 am

    surprised no Ken saro-Wiwa on the list ???

    • Anonymous Aboki

      August 11, 2015 at 7:27 pm

      Basi & company was, is gold! Its not today hustling start..

  48. anon

    August 11, 2015 at 3:42 am

    This is probably the best post I’ve come across on BN. Have read a few of the books, and must say “Great recommendations African Bad Girl”. Now I have a few more books on my list. BTW thanks to all of the commenters who have also made recommendations.

    • Folake

      August 11, 2015 at 8:00 am

      As in!!!!!

  49. Greg

    August 11, 2015 at 6:52 am

    I read 2 of the books on the list via @TheReadClub on twitter just last month. Ake and The Secret Lives of Baba Segi’s Wives. It was very interesting. The author of Baba Segi joined the discussion on @TheReadClub also. Made it worthwhile. Every book lover should check them out. They tell you how to get the books too so it makes it easy. They’ve been featured here – nantygreens.com/features/3-ways-thereadclub-is-improving-reading-culture-in-nigeria/ and here – pulse.ng/arts_culture/the-book-movement-meet-twitters-reading-club-id3666044.html. I think Bella should feature them one of these days. Great job to boost the reading culture.

    • Anonymous Aboki

      August 11, 2015 at 7:29 pm

      I second this! @thereadclub are onto something..

  50. Chuckleberry

    August 11, 2015 at 7:07 am

    Amazing…..I remember I started reading Pacesetter novels in primary 4/5. I attended a FGGC……and it was a pride to read most of these books. It was more like a competition…… who could read the fastest and give a compelling summary during literature class and like a rubber stamp, the stories stuck (even after …… years)
    My love for print has been an unending journey…..need to revive it asap…..This list and the comments just excited me and brought back pleasant memories.
    I look at my daughter and feel sorry for her, with their bogus American and British curriculum that gives them no time to savour the real taste of African culture. I,m proud of my educational background……it may not have been much but it sure shaped me well. .

    • Lala

      August 11, 2015 at 3:23 pm

      I agree. Many people on Bellanaija seem to have attended a Federal Government College.

    • TA

      August 11, 2015 at 4:43 pm

      @ Lala, nah not so fast. I did not attended any FGC or Unity school but my friends and I lived for pacesetters and other books that were published .

  51. I love Shea butter

    August 11, 2015 at 8:37 am

    Let’s me add this, “our husband had gone mad again”by Ola Rotimi.

  52. Demilade

    August 11, 2015 at 9:09 am

    Yes yes yes! I love it when books are featured on BN. I’m very pleased to know that I’ve read six out of the books on this list. In fact, I’ve been hunting for Efuru for a while now , my mum said it’s a lovely book. The Concubine by Elechi Amadi and Americanah by Chimamanda Adichie are also very nice books. The books in the African Writer Series are lovely.xx

    coco-bella.blogspot.com

    • Anonymous Aboki

      August 11, 2015 at 7:33 pm

      AWS was, is gbo’gbo e’ro abeg, hence, there are some terrible books there, I shall not name titles…

  53. Hadassah

    August 11, 2015 at 9:33 am

    Oh my Days!!!
    This has to be one of my fav BN post!
    This just brought pleasant memories…
    Please, where can I get these books in Lagos (especially Second Chnace)…
    I wanna re-read them.
    Many Thanks at your anticipated responses

    • Demilade

      August 11, 2015 at 12:07 pm

      The Hub Book shop in Palms Shopping Mall, The book store at Terra Kulture and Glendora book store in ICM. xx

    • Hadassah

      August 11, 2015 at 4:05 pm

      Thank you so much Demilade…
      I would def check them out!
      Xx

    • Anonymous Aboki

      August 11, 2015 at 7:35 pm

      Glendora at ICM is unnecessarily expensive. The Hub at the Palms stocks new titles and popular old ones…Terra Kulture is your best bet..

  54. Ifeoma

    August 11, 2015 at 9:50 am

    Cyprian Ekwensi’s People of the City and Adichie’s Purple Hibiscus these two are my all time Favorites!!!

  55. Nammy

    August 11, 2015 at 9:59 am

    Let me add “Burning grass” by Cyprian Ekwensi

  56. MIST

    August 11, 2015 at 10:08 am

    Petals of blood by ngugi wa thiong’o(I loved reading books from this Kenyan Author)….Things fall apart, No longer at ease, 99 day in agege(Yaw Brenya), Marriage of Anansewaa (Efua Surthaland), the beautiful ones are not yet born, weep not child, (I can go on forever) and all the pacesetters series, I loved them and I must say they brought out my love for reading, it also opened my eye about other cultures in Africa. Thank God for my Grandpa who was a ardent raeder and a teacher, it was on his book shelves that my love for reading developed.(God bless his resting soul)

  57. jingo

    August 11, 2015 at 10:43 am

    The first prose I read by a Nigerian author was ‘”my father’s daughter by Mabel Segun”. the Concubine by Elechi Amadi also stuck and Violence by Festus Iyayi was unforgettable, there is this yoruba book too ‘Kuye’ I dont know the author. When I was in secondary schl, I had a clique of friends and we were all voracious readers, you dare not borrow us a novel cos we’ll divide into 2 parts, someone will read the first part and another person the last part or more parts depending on the number of people interested.
    When I got to uni and my grades were slipping by my 4th year, I had to give myself brain and start reading my law books. Now I still read sha, I just finished reading all the 7 Harry potter books again. I love books, they are among the best things in the whole wide world. so much to enjoy.

    • Anonymous Aboki

      August 11, 2015 at 7:40 pm

      Violence by Festus Iyayi, gaddem!!

  58. Aramide

    August 11, 2015 at 10:45 am

    Let me add Chukwuemeka Ike’s the Bottled Leopard to this list
    Sizwe Bansi is Dead by Athol Fugard

    • Lala

      August 11, 2015 at 3:25 pm

      Time Changes Yesterday by Nyengi Koin?

    • Anonymous Aboki

      August 11, 2015 at 7:41 pm

      Ah, Eniola was too cute…

    • Idomagirl

      August 16, 2015 at 2:18 am

      One of my faves in JS3 . I read it so many times!!!

  59. christianfictionlover

    August 11, 2015 at 11:01 am

    I love books! recently stumbled on Abimbola Dare’s When Broken chords…. great read. short tho. Loved the Second Chance!!!!! amazing book.

    • lauren

      August 11, 2015 at 1:48 pm

      Just read this on Kindle. Short but sweet. The writer is a Christian and writes from a world view.

  60. chinelo

    August 11, 2015 at 11:06 am

    Nostalgic to say the least! Other good books include; The potter’s wheel, Passport of mallam Ilia, African night entertainment, The Victims.

  61. Icey

    August 11, 2015 at 11:21 am

    This post is the best ever. I love this list of books, brings back memories and I have read some, I wonder if they are still available for purchase on the shelf anyway.

  62. ij

    August 11, 2015 at 11:26 am

    i know he is not Nigerian but throw in all books written by khaled hosseini and you are good to go
    The Kite Runner,
    A Thousand Splendid Suns,
    And the Mountains Echoed

    • Anonymous Aboki

      August 11, 2015 at 7:41 pm

      +1000

  63. lollly

    August 11, 2015 at 11:38 am

    My Book of Bible Stories!!!!

    oh how i loved that book. Please is it still produced???

    • Anonymous Aboki

      August 11, 2015 at 7:44 pm

      Yes, it is o! Jehovah Witnesses & their relentlessness, they would now stop producing? It was on stock at their stall at the last Lagos Book Fair, UNILAG..they ran out of stock sha..

  64. The Buttery Hotness

    August 11, 2015 at 11:38 am

    *furiously jotting down list of books I haven’t read*

    The comments section is a wonderful place.

  65. Blessedheart

    August 11, 2015 at 12:55 pm

    I just did a search on Okadabooks and 90% of books mentioned here are not there. I think they need to do better in bringing Nigerian books to our doorsteps.

  66. mamawin

    August 11, 2015 at 1:06 pm

    The idea of a book club isn’t bad at all. I will like to join one

  67. Chechi

    August 11, 2015 at 1:07 pm

    So happy about this post it’s bringing back so many memories. I remember how I hid to read Second Chance in Primary 4. Dunno how I missed Efuru considering my love for Flora Nwapa. Hopefully they’ll have it at The Hub. Now bookmarking this page.

  68. Mike

    August 11, 2015 at 1:35 pm

    Reading books ; such pure bliss .My favourites excluding those on your list are – Measuring time by Helon Habilla (should deff make the list ) , Small island by Andrea Levvy (though not an African ,her story portrays a topic we can relate to – racism* funniest book I’ve read this year* and yeah , the river between

    • Mz Socially Awkward...

      August 12, 2015 at 3:57 pm

      “Small Island” by Andrea Levy!!!!! Yesssss!!!! That book was good, thank you so much for reminding me about her (read “Small Island” many moons ago) because I just googled and she’s got a couple of more recent novels out. WoohooIII (… hopefully, these won’t join my “Dragon” trilogy in gathering dust on the book shelf …)

    • Koffie

      August 14, 2015 at 2:40 pm

      I think you were trying to remember “The Atonement Child” by Francine Rivers up there. Yeah, her books have depth. Maybe you should start with “A Voice in the wind” by Francine Rivers, it’s got so much of pain and suffering sha but then it means you get to feel all the raw emotions of the characters and would leap for joy when one is saved. She’s my favourite Christian author. And I couldn’t have attended school in your time, I’m a smallie.

  69. Peaches77

    August 11, 2015 at 1:44 pm

    Kai sweet memories!
    I read 3 out of these listed books back then, and HOAYS in 2011 or so. It’ll be wonderful to read them again especially with renewed understanding. Just saw in a poster’s comment, Camara Laye, Without a silver spoon. African child (that’s Camara Laye right?), and all the oldies. I will bookmark this page and begin the hunt-down for these books.
    I just bought “Chike and the River” for my 5 year old. I have been warning them, time to banish or ration ‘Boomerang’ and ‘Cbeebies’ is nigh! lol!

  70. Peaches77

    August 11, 2015 at 1:46 pm

    Kai sweet memories!
    I read 3 out of these listed books back then, and HOAYS in 2011 or so. It’ll be wonderful to read them again especially with renewed understanding. Just saw in a comment above, Camara Laye, Without a silver spoon, African child (that’s Camara Laye right?), and all the oldies and smiled. I will bookmark this page and begin the hunt-down for these books.
    I just bought “Chike and the River” for my 5 year old. I have been warning them, time to banish or ration ‘Boomerang’ and ‘Cbeebies’ is nigh! lol!

  71. Eniola/ Ms Catwalq

    August 11, 2015 at 1:59 pm

    This post and the ensuing comments are a hug for me today. It’s so nice to have so many people discussing how the written word played a strong part in shaping their views of the world today.

    I know these were textbooks but I absolutely loved: The Drummer Boy, Koku Baboni, Born Without A Silver Spoon.

    And for the person who wanted to know where you can find the classics, head down to Ojuelegba, sans accent and check your boys. Just found Passport of Mallam Illia. Unfortunately, the Pacesetters are no longer in print but for about 400+ pounds, you can get the entire collection from the publisher. I looked into it a few years back so not sure what the cost would be in now. And you will have to buy the collection if you want it new. If you do not mind them used, Ojuelegba will hook you up sharp sharp.

    *sighs* so happy.

    • TA

      August 11, 2015 at 4:37 pm

      @ Eniola/Ms Catwalq
      Me too. I’m in literary heaven right now. I came to this post late but ol’boy I’m so loooving it. Those who know me,know its only a book, a good book that can keep me entertained forget TV series jor. I have read most of the books listed by African bad girl so *…shines teeth* :-). The few ones I have not read and some I have seen in the comment section are a must-haves. I would gladly pay to have all books in the Pacesetter series and African writers series.

    • Anonymous Aboki

      August 11, 2015 at 7:48 pm

      You’re definitely in the know. There’s also this place at Ilupeju; MacMillans?…

      Drummer Boy, with his jumper & tambourine, lol..

  72. Amara

    August 11, 2015 at 2:04 pm

    The concubine
    Our husband has gone mad again…..

    even ralia the sugar girl, Ifeanyi and Obi, and one i cannot remember where the sang ‘row row row your boat, gently down the stream’….

    • Anonymous Aboki

      August 11, 2015 at 7:49 pm

      Ralia the Sugar Girl is a classic sha..the witch, search party..

  73. Abigail

    August 11, 2015 at 3:11 pm

    This post is AWESOME. I’ve read at least 5 of these books. YAYYYYY! The comment section is FIRE! Great to see so many book lovers. I have so many books to add to my list. *Excited*

    There were so many books being sold at “Africa Writes” which was held at the British Library last month. Also, Flora Nwapa’s Efuru can be purchased on Amazon. I just received my copy a few weeks ago.

    Currently reading Noo-Saro Wiwa’s “looking for Transwonderland” which is interesting.

    Also, this is not a Nigerian book but Marlon James’ “The book of Night Women” was a phenomenal book. Beautifully written but haunting,

    Bella, I think a book club is due…lool!

    • whocares

      August 11, 2015 at 5:21 pm

      Oh Man, I was supposed to go to that. Ah I am so sorry I missed it now. I finished from work and decided that I was too tired to go. Hopefully there is another such event soon.
      Ps: who has a copy of the second chance? I am very serious. It was not by any means a great book, but I just want to read it again. So, if you have a copy to lend someborry kindly reply. Thaink yu 🙂

    • Anonymous Aboki

      August 11, 2015 at 7:51 pm

      I’d have to check my library, I might have a copy..

    • whocares

      August 12, 2015 at 7:54 am

      AnonymousAboki. I have book marked this page. I will be checking it constantly for your response if you do have it. I promise I am extremely careful with books. I treat them like babies 🙂 Thank you in advance !!!!!

  74. Amy

    August 11, 2015 at 3:44 pm

    bookworms unite lol, I’m loving the comments…Buchi Emecheta’s ‘Head above water’ is also a good read, I can’t find my copy of Mulkin Mata by Iyorwuese H. (its a play sha but its good too)

    • Amy

      August 11, 2015 at 3:49 pm

      “the beautiful ones are not yet born” too

    • Anonymous Aboki

      August 11, 2015 at 7:53 pm

      the beautyful ones are not yet born…Achebe dissed Ayi on the book sha, lol…

    • Amy

      August 11, 2015 at 3:52 pm

      and i’ll read anything Nana Ai writes

  75. Tkum

    August 11, 2015 at 5:09 pm

    you see that book The Concubine eh….best of all for me…anytime i see the book, feels like i have never read it before. Started reading that book since my Primary Four…Stole from my father’s lib.

  76. Ogamazi

    August 11, 2015 at 5:46 pm

    & your BIBLE is also a great read and the greatest book ever written. Plz include it in your list too and your life will never remain the same.

    • Anonymous Aboki

      August 11, 2015 at 7:53 pm

      Amen? Amen!

  77. aderin

    August 11, 2015 at 6:44 pm

    My heart kept beating while reading all these comments….I know I won’t rest till I read all of these books!!!!! ‘Under the brown rusted roofs’ is still my best

  78. God's Child

    August 12, 2015 at 4:12 am

    Anyone read George Orwell’s Animal Farm and 1984

  79. God's Child

    August 12, 2015 at 4:18 am

    And just saying the Greatest Book of them all is the Bible, it comes in so many different versions for better understanding. It has a lasting and the greatest impact in our lives. God Bless

  80. Angel Deco

    August 12, 2015 at 7:23 am

    Ahhhh! Bella naijirians! Hw come u guys managed to remember “Evbu my love”? Its soo refreshin to see books i’d forgotten mentioned here. My reading culture has to be revived ooo. No tym to waste tym………. #off to join @thereadclub on twitter

    Who remember these books?
    Sade in form six
    The cyclist
    Blind choice
    The virtous woman
    Time remembers yesterday (i hope i got that ryt)
    The virgin…….

    • whocares

      August 12, 2015 at 7:54 am

      I remember the virtuous woman!!!Laila and nana no? Gosh so many boooooks

  81. Angel Deco

    August 12, 2015 at 7:55 am

    *Time changes Yesterday*

    Had to come back and ask: has anyone read “Hopes and Betrayal”? Lovely book

  82. Toby Nwazor

    August 12, 2015 at 8:45 am

    Oh my God I have been reading a lot of comments since yesterday, and I stopped for a while. Will go back and read the remaining ones.

    @ African Bad Girl, this post is just wonderful, and rekindled precious memories for me.

    NigerianAmericanGirl1, I am presently reading Americanah, after reading half of a yellow sun not too long ago. Some people think Chimamanda is overrated. I don’t think so. Honestly, she is very good with what she does-story telling.

    @ MSA, you have a dangerously good memory. See all the books you listed over here. Chisos! Idi egwu.I have always looked forward to reading your comments on Atoke’s morning banter, and Isio’s tuesday posts (which have become scarce again. warris appunin’?)

    @Nwanyi na aga aga, odi ka gi na MSA bu nwanne in having photographic memories (seems you are related…)

    These lists make me remember my growing up days. I read my first ‘novel’ on the night of my nursery three graduation day. I can’t remember the name of the said ‘novel’, but it was about one Ojo and his family.

    From there I went forward, reading as much as I can. Thankfully, my parents had a big library and we always had books to read during the holidays. I enjoyed them all.

    I read a lot of the pacesetters series too. How can I not remember African Night Entertainment or something like that (forgive my hazy memory, i am not MSA, lol).

    Then there was Chike and the River, Things Fall Apart, Eze goes to School, etc. As I got into secondary school, I started reading all of them Ngugi Wa Thong’s, Elechi Amadi’s, and even a couple of Wole Soyinka’s. I enjoyed the Lion and the jewel, but I was never able to complete ‘The Interpreters. (that man is another world o).

    Then there were the foreign novels. Treasure Island and the rest. I got introduced to James Hadley Chase in SS1. I had to cover the back with newspaper to read it, lol..

    But how on earth did we all remember my favourite Nigerian writer (after Chimamanda my new love). I mean Chukwuemeka Ike. Jeez! His books were extraordinary for me. I love detective novels, and he was the closest I could get to fast paced action, suspense and thrills.

    From bottled Leopard to The Potter’s Wheel, Chicken Chasers, and Expo ’77, I read almost everything he wrote. i remember going to the Library back then to read his books. I was so crazy about him that I used to go to our school Library, and instead of borrowing ‘Rajput’, Mass Transfer, or thermodynamics (Engine boi), I was borrowing novels. I remember how excited I was the first day I saw Purple Hibiscus on the shelf. It was I discovered a treasure. My classmates back then never understood how an engineering student could enjoy reading so much novels. Hahaha.

    OMG, I’d better stop writing before I write a comment longer than MSA’s. Lol

    • Mz Socially Awkward...

      August 12, 2015 at 4:10 pm

      Hahahahaha! See as you “haff” use me to do “hexampu” with your last sentence! 😀 Some of those books are stamped in our memories because back then, NTA used to come on only from 5pm and children’s shows lasted only until 7pm (often tirelessly repeated, by the way) and there was no social media. Also, on days when the spirit moved him, Daddy would send a message from “the office” that nobody should go out and play (for reasons best known to him … “side-eyes to dad*)… so we read and read and read to entertain our overactive imaginations. 🙂

  83. Toby Nwazor

    August 12, 2015 at 8:57 am

    Chei see typos everywhere o. I meant to write how did we ”not’ remember… Make una forgive other typos.

    @omoge naija, My GOD will BLESS you! (in Papa Ayo’s Voice) for mentioning African Child. That book was what made me start thinking of being an author for the first time. After reading it, I was like, “I can do this”.

    @wizzy, I am glad there is someone else that enjoyed Chukwuemeka Ike’s classics.

  84. Toby Nwazor

    August 12, 2015 at 9:25 am

    Oh my God I have been reading a lot of comments since yesterday, and I stopped for a while. Will go back and read the remaining ones.

    This post is just wonderful, and rekindled precious memories for me.

    NigerianAmericanGirl1, I am presently reading Americanah, after reading half of a yellow sun not too long ago. Some people think Chimamanda is overrated. I don’t think so. Honestly, she is very good with what she does-story telling.

    @ MSA, you have a dangerously good memory. See all the books you listed over here. Chisos! Idi egwu.I have always looked forward to reading your comments on Atoke’s morning banter, and Isio’s tuesday posts (which have become scarce again. warris appunin’?)

    @Nwanyi na aga aga, odi ka gi na MSA bu nwanne in having photographic memories (seems you are related…)

    These lists make me remember my growing up days. I read my first ‘novel’ on the night of my nursery three graduation day. I can’t remember the name of the said ‘novel’, but it was about one Ojo and his family.

    From there I went forward, reading as much as I can. Thankfully, my parents had a big library and we always had books to read during the holidays. I enjoyed them all.

    I read a lot of the pacesetters series too. How can I not remember African Night Entertainment or something like that (forgive my hazy memory, i am not MSA, lol).

    Then there was Chike and the River, Things Fall Apart, Eze goes to School, etc. As I got into secondary school, I started reading all of them Ngugi Wa Thong’s, Elechi Amadi’s, and even a couple of Wole Soyinka’s. I enjoyed the Lion and the jewel, but I was never able to complete ‘The Interpreters. (that man is another world o).

    Then there were the foreign novels. Treasure Island and the rest. I got introduced to James Hadley Chase in SS1. I had to cover the back with newspaper to read it, lol..

    But how on earth did we all remember my favourite Nigerian writer (after Chimamanda my new love). I mean Chukwuemeka Ike. Jeez! His books were extraordinary for me. I love detective novels, and he was the closest I could get to fast paced action, suspense and thrills.

    From bottled Leopard to The Potter’s Wheel, Chicken Chasers, and Expo ’77, I read almost everything he wrote. i remember going to the Library back then to read his books. I was so crazy about him that I used to go to our school Library, and instead of borrowing ‘Rajput’, Mass Transfer, or thermodynamics (Engine boi), I was borrowing novels. I remember how excited I was the first day I saw Purple Hibiscus on the shelf. It was I discovered a treasure. My classmates back then never understood how an engineering student could enjoy reading so much novels. Hahaha.

    OMG, I’d better stop writing before I write a comment longer than MSA’s. Lol

    P.S: My former commet about typos was referring to the typos in this particular comment

  85. pink

    August 12, 2015 at 3:10 pm

    This post just brought a big smile to my face. I was a somewhat weird child as i preferred reading to making conversation. I read everything i came across until my parents started getting worried that i had a medical problem as i was reading some of my uncle’s old medical books. lol.. Reading just takes you into another world. I have read five of those books and I’ve already started hunting down the rest. i truly loved Efuru by Flora Nwapa. I just recently started thinking of the book again, now on a mission to read it again. Reading truly has many benefits, it opens your mind and even improves your grammar. My sister couldn’t understand why as a kid i was more interested in adult fiction than children’s books with pictures. lol. i really pray my kids acquire a good reading culture.

  86. Rhecks

    August 12, 2015 at 11:13 pm

    So many memories and nostalgia….who remembers “Agony in her voice “. I had to read an old and half torn copy recently for the 100th time! Abimbolu, The Drummer boy, The Second Chance by Nyengi Koin. So many sha! Lol

  87. Somiii

    August 13, 2015 at 7:40 am

    Karen Kingsbury is one author who has the ability to transport you to the world of her characters. I havent read any of her books this year and I am craving them like a child craves Candy. I am also in support of a book club/forum here on BN.
    MZ Socially awkward and Dr N, I see you. ?

    • Nma Nazzy

      August 26, 2015 at 11:54 am

      Everyone says that about Karen Kingsbury but I haven’t really loved reading her books. It’s always a struggle.

      Francine Rivers is just magical!

  88. Maryam (Munch Moda)

    August 13, 2015 at 12:44 pm

    I’ve read half of this list and I have to say they are all fantastic books – well written and thought provoking. I read Things Fall Apart Again in university for an African American Literature Class and it was great to hear the book dissected from a non-African prospective. I couldn’t go through all the comments but here are a few more –
    Time Changes Yesterday – Nyengi Koin
    Ghana Must Go – Taiye Selasi
    Siswe Banzi is Dead – Winston Ntshona, Athol Fugard, John Kani
    The Cost of Our Lives – Ariyike Akinbobola
    Marriage of Anansewa – efua sutherland

    Happy Reading!

    • Idomagirl

      August 14, 2015 at 9:25 pm

      I found Ghana Must Go so difficult to read. I couldn’t get last the 1st chapter 🙁

    • Atoke

      Atoke

      August 14, 2015 at 10:13 pm

      Me too!

      After Ghana Must Go I’ve become really wary of Internet based raves about a book. Plus there were too many typos. Spider King’s Daughter by Chibundu Onuzo was another difficult read.

      I just finished reading Yewande Omotoso’s Bomboy. (Y).
      Currently reading Arundhati Roy’s The God of Small Things and it is ACE!

    • whocares

      September 23, 2015 at 4:46 pm

      GOD OF SMALLL THINGS IS AN AMAZING BOOOOOK. I gave that to a friend to read and he could not get past the first two pages. I am ashamed to admit that much as I love that man, I could not speak to him for two days. I was too angry. lool.

    • Atoke

      Atoke

      September 23, 2015 at 4:58 pm

      Girl!!!!!

      I feel your anger.

      Still on the matter of books…

      A must-read for all Africans is:
      Wizard of The Crow by Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o (Yes, I Googled the proper spelling of his name)

      On a general note:
      If you love Chic Lit, then Sophie Kinsella will leave you laughing till your sides hurt!

  89. mia

    August 13, 2015 at 4:13 pm

    for those who want any of these old time books delivered to your doorstep, especially the pacesetters series that seem to be out of print, please contact www. amabbooks.com, thank me later

  90. Koffie

    August 14, 2015 at 2:48 pm

    I read The Joys of Motherhood way too early in life, looool. I was in secondary school and had a discussion with my literature teacher on how virginity is over rated because of the plight of the main character in that book. I want to read it again

  91. Idomagirl

    August 14, 2015 at 9:43 pm

    Great list. I love this post and the comments.

    I’d add some of my faves to list:

    The Concubine – Elechi Amadi
    Ola Rotimi – The Gods are Not To Blame
    Trials of Brother Jero
    Passport of Mallam Illia – Cyprian Ekwensi
    Burning Grass
    Chike & The River
    The PalmWine Drinkard – Amos Tutola
    Akata Witch – Nnedi Okorafor (I read this a few days ago and I couldn’t put it down. Really great book that excites your imagination).
    There Was A Country (a must read IMO)

    And so many more that I’ve forgotten at the moment.

  92. Nma Nazzy

    August 26, 2015 at 11:51 am

    Y’ALL JUST GAVE ME A SLICE OF HEAVEN. I DIDN’T SEE “THIS IS OUR CHANCE” BY JAMES ENE HENSHAW, “THERE WAS A COUNTRY” BY CHINA ACHEBE, “THE RETURN OF IKENGA” BY CHUKWUEMEKA OHUKA, “EZE GOES TO SCHOOL” BY ONUORA NZEKWU…
    THEY ARE COUNTLESS

    AM I THE ONLY ONE ABSOLUTELY IN LOVE WITH NORA ROBERTS?

  93. Dee-USA

    September 7, 2015 at 9:02 pm

    I just scanned through every comment and not a one listed Chinua Achebe’s “There was a country!” How you can reference Half of Yellow Sun as the guide to understanding the history of Biafra, and not recommend TWAC as a top 10 is beyond me.

  94. Jesbadoma

    September 23, 2015 at 4:32 pm

    Things Fall Apart is definitely a masterpiece. Have read it uncountable times and each time i read it, i still get the chills. Second Class Citizens touched me in a way i can’t explain. I totally admired the main protagonist Ada. Jagua Nana, read it when i was far too young to do so. I also love “The Beautiful Ones are not yet Born” I love reading and although the realities of modern living has made it very hard for me to read as much as before, I still find time to read once in a while.I get transported each time i read a good book. Also a great fan of Danielle Steele, Sidney Sheldon and Jules Verne.

  95. Dearest

    January 3, 2016 at 11:45 pm

    Oh the Memories here, how sweet! You all made me remember my late classmate of then. We used to compete then and save our pocket money to buy books at Yaba on the way from school. Hmmn. Ok, how about the book, “Without A Silver Spoon”? Nobody mentioned it. And those Pacesetters series.

  96. marves

    January 29, 2016 at 12:48 am

    Ehen! Where was I all this while. Anyway. Does anyone has a Copy of ngugi wa thiongo’s “devil on the cross” akinbolu babarinsa’ “anything for money” elechi amadi’s “bottled leopard” ? Sadly a lot of nigerian novels I read did not have covers and didn’t start from the beginning.

  97. marves

    January 29, 2016 at 12:54 am

    Ehen! Where was I all this while. Anyway. Does anyone has a Copy of ngugi wa thiongo’s “devil on the cross” akinbolu babarinsa’ “anything for money” elechi amadi’s “bottled leopard”. Mabel segun’s “my father’s daughter and “my mother’s daughter. Pacesetters’ “mark of the cobra” and “the worshippers”. “juju rock” ekwensi’s ” an African night’ s entertainment” Sadly a lot of Nigerian novels I read did not have covers and didn’t start from the beginning. On competition: I used to compete with my classmates on who was the fastest reader. Oh did I forget to mention, my first real hardcore eroticA was a nigerian novel, complete with nigerian local and xters. The book had no cover and ended just a few page of the end. In retrospect, those “no beginning” and no end books, helped honed my skills at imagination and getting to find out the other person’s view point. What wouldn’t I do for purely pre-2005 nigerian books.

  98. marves

    January 29, 2016 at 1:06 am

    Haven read Raymond Richard martins’ “a world of ice and fire series since 1991, soomebody should please tell, no, compell him to writ and publish ” the winds of winter” like yesterday now. Haba! Wetin we do you now. P.D for those of you who don’t know, that’s the Game of thrones novel.

  99. fattkay

    February 7, 2016 at 8:32 pm

    Nice one on here.

  100. Ladking

    November 24, 2016 at 11:44 pm

    Actually Marves, I have the winds of winter.
    Mail me [email protected] and I’d send it to you.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Star Features

Advertisement
css.php