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An Aje-Butter’s Guide to NYSC

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I just completed my one-year stint in the National Youth Service Corps program. In the past year, I blogged about my experience “The Aje-Butter’s Guide to NYSC“, Why Aje-Butter? Well, I am a classic Aje-Butter and will never deny it! I took the liberty of defining Aje-Butter as: ‘An individual born into a privileged lifestyle in Nigeria.’ I can attest that compared to the average Nigerian, we are more than comfortable. To God be the glory (I’m also an aspiring Nollywood actress)

I left secondary school at 15 and moved immediately to the States for college. I lived there for 14 years, before I decided to make the move to come back to Nigeria for at least one year, during which I would complete NYSC. A lot of people wondered if I was crazy for leaving a comfortable life to come back to Naija madness. Others were sure I was moving back because I was almost 30, unmarried and wanted to find a husband . I really moved back because I felt unfulfilled in my career and wanted to explore other opportunities.

Coming back was a TOTAL culture shock, especially since I had visited just 4 or 5 times during my 14 years away. For instance, someone demanded that I use my right hand to hand him something… in 2012, really? My strategy regarding NYSC was to work for a few months (at a company that didn’t require the certificate) and then sign up for the 2011 Batch C group. In retrospect, I should have registered immediately and started serving the following month with the Batch B group.

Anyway, here’s my journey broken down into the different stages of the service year.

MOBILIZATION
As a foreign graduate, I had to register at the NYSC Headquarters in Abuja. My first attempt was not successful, as I didn’t have one of the required documents – who knew your statement of WAEC result isn’t the same thing as the WAEC certificate? My second attempt to register was successful, but had its complications. First of all, I needed a billion and one passport photographs and my picture came out making me look lightskinned. Throughout the year, different NYSC officials argued that I wasn’t the same person in my ID card! Additionally, all but one of my documents had my first, middle and last names – the other document had just my first and last name. Because of this, I had to go across the street to the High Court and get a sworn affidavit stating that ‘Berry Choco Latte’ is the same person as ‘Berry Latte’ and that all documents belonged to me. I eventually registered and was told to pick up my Call-Up letter in my state of residence in a few weeks.

Now, being a foreign-graduate, I was expecting to be posted to Lagos or Abuja – or my state-of-choice. However, one of the first signs you see when you walk into the NYSC Headquarters is: Foreign Graduates are NOT ALLOWED to select their state postings. Needless to say, waiting for my call-up letter was a tad nerve wracking. Well, when I picked up my letter, I laughed in disbelief. I cannot divulge further information, but let’s just say the powers-that-be intervened and I was en-route to Iyana-Ipaja, Lagos NYSC camp.

ORIENTATION
I never went to boarding school in Nigeria so living in a dorm/hostel in Nigeria (albeit for 3 weeks) was a completely new and terrifying experience. Registering and getting accommodation in camp was a bit of a nightmare. I got to camp the day after it started – through enough hustling, smiling innocently at officials and a screaming match, I got settled under 6 hours. Because I came late, I didn’t get a room, but a hallway had been converted into one and I managed to get the last bunk there. Sleeping there the first night was hard, and it didn’t improve the rest of the time. My mattress was 1 inch thick, the spring on my bunk was bad and caved inwards, and it was HOT . Then the mosquitoes made me dread every night on camp. I even succumbed to tears a few times. My friends on the outside pleaded with me to escape, but I was determined to survive camp in one piece.

I tried to eat as little as possible so I wouldn’t have to use the bathroom often – yes the horror stories are true! Nasty, disgusting, filthy, atrocious conditions! After a few days though, I noticed that while morning drills went on, there were women cleaning the bathrooms, so I timed my baths to right after drills.

Daytime in camp wasn’t that bad. In fact, compared to other camps, we had it pretty good in Lagos. The mami market was a bustling hub of vendors – coffee, fast food, bars, shops, salons, etc. I heard there was even a spot where you could rent a bed for “sexy time.”! I wasn’t a mami-market kinda person, so I got involved in my platoon’s activities to make friends and keep busy. I marched everyday up until the last week, and participated in the drama competition. Our platoon won BEST DRAMA by the way – I portrayed Bella the seductive school girl trying to get her corper teacher to give her higher grades (I told you I was an aspiring Nollywood actress). There were also BORING seminars and lectures, during which I slept or read a book. 22 days after I got there, I left camp knowing that I could do anything I set my mind to, and I’m not as fragile as everyone thinks!

PRIMARY ASSIGNMENT/COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT SERVICE
One of the reasons why I didn’t want to be posted to Port Harcourt where I grew up, was that all corpers in Rivers State were mandated to teach. So for my primary assignment, I was posted to an oil company in Lagos. Thankfully, my batch was the last one before the new NYSC Director General made it compulsory to serve in Health, Rural Government, Agriculture or Teaching. Now, one would think that serving where I did would result a year-of-fun and/or gainful work experience. Well, I was BORED OUT OF MY MIND for most of it. Although my first words to my supervisor were “Hello, I’m Berry. I have an MBA and have worked professionally for 3.5 years so kindly make use of my skills as much as possible,” I spent most of my workdays browsing the internet, blogging, reading and daydreaming. I’m one of the few people who would say an emphatic NO to being retained, given that I did nothing for one whole year. It’s not all bad though – I made a few contacts that would be helpful in the future, made some amazing friends, and at least have a foot in the door if I try to come back through another department.

For my CD (Community Development), I was 100% sure I didn’t want to participate in any of my local government activities. I had heard corpers just go and sit down for a few hours, waiting for their CD cards to be signed. I wanted to engage my mind and explore my creativity so I signed up for one of the skills acquisition classes and proceeded to learn Beadmaking, Wedding Accessories, Gele Tying and Make-Over Arts. The makeover class ended up being a joke – one time the instructor shaved off most of my eye-bros during a demonstration – notice I wrote eye-BROS , not BROWS. I could tie a gele for a period of 3 weeks.My favorite classes were beadmaking and wedding accessories. I have the tools and skills necessary to start up my own business if I so choose. The instructors were really friendly and eager to teach , and I really appreciate their efforts.

A friend I made in camp and I had actually wanted to do a combined individual CD project – writing a proposal and getting funds to make the Lagos camp registration process easier via computers and internet access. We never followed up. Another idea I had was to get crowd control props for my local government office in Lagos Island. Going to General CD (once a month) at that office almost always turned into a battle – I have to ask why adult men and women cannot stand in line peacefully. Nigerians, can we teach our children orderliness please? I think it’s too late for my generation already.

WINDING UP/PASSING OUT
The last 2 months of my service year , I mentally, literally, figuratively, financially, educationally, everything-ally counted down to my Passing Out day. Time passes so quickly and ironically just when you can see the light at the end of the tunnel, time draaaags! I barely participated in the winding up activities – I attended the Job Awareness seminar, and the Passing Out Parade rehearsals were cancelled last-minute. On Passing Out day, my friends and I piled up in a car and headed to Iyana-Ipaja for the last time. Imagine the HUGE sigh of relief when I finally collected my NYSC certificate! I’m going to scan, photocopy, laminate and frame it!
I have spent a lot of time trying to decide what next. At the time of the tragic Dana crash, I was so disheartened that I made up my mind I would leave Nigeria the first chance I got. However, the truth is Nigeria isn’t the worst place in the world.

I’m inclined to say NYSC is a waste of time and big joke BUT the reason why it was started in the first place was for Nigerian youths to assimilate into other tribes/communities/cultures, and get much-needed valuable work experience. If the necessary infrastructures were properly in place, it would be a program that would serve Nigerians as a whole, Nigerian youths, and the government so much better. There is no reason why security for corpers should be an issue. There is no reason why corps members should be glorified errand boys and girls. I remember my mum saying in her day, corpers left the program fielding job offers from multiple institutions and organizations. There was also a time when corpers were looked at fondly by the general public. It’s sad what the state of Nigeria has come to. I try hard to hold onto hope that things will get better in my lifetime.
If anyone wants to sign up for NYSC from the diaspora, I strongly encourage you to read my blog entries. I wanted not only to keep myself busy, but give a FULL firsthand account of the NYSC service year.

Happy reading and wish you luck!

 

Berry Dakara is a Lifestyle blogger (http://berrydakara.blogspot.com) who shares her thoughts on anything and everything from marriage to friendships to faith, and other random topics. You can find her on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook - @berrydakara. She's also a weekly contributor to the African Naturalistas, a natural hair website and consultancy dedicated to teaching healthy hair care practices.

55 Comments

  1. pynk

    November 7, 2012 at 10:40 am

    lol @ calling one’s self an ajebutta.

    • No Long Thing

      November 7, 2012 at 3:21 pm

      She says she’s an Aje Butter, how that one take dey pain you?

  2. Aderonke

    November 7, 2012 at 10:45 am

    u gat me in stitches @ BROS and not BROWS. cant stop laffing mehn

  3. kiks

    November 7, 2012 at 10:51 am

    haba now…. this is sooo not encouraging… but then again, shes a butter-breed… im s corper ryt now n maybe cos im a pessimist, i think nysc could be 1 of the best experiences eva.. 1st of all, in a country lyk ours, the NYSC is is the only yr ur assured of a job… weda na teaching or farming.. then again, the treatment u get wen they col u “govment pikin” is just gengen… camp was wacky i agree but personaly, when i think back, i ll soooo do it again.. then post camp, when its tym for POP activies, for me, it goes 2 ways… if u work in a villa, plenty respect… u ll b like a queen n bliv me, you wnt b d only copa.. free food n ppl will practically bow down to u… if u work in a borin office lyk i do, omo, thank God… they pay u n it ll b in ur CV ba.. take ur tym, make as many contacts n then learn.. thnx to free internet and youtube.. at lst thats wot im doin.. oya enuf sed… lemme go bk to my “how to make hair fascinators” youtube video

    • me yay

      November 7, 2012 at 11:19 am

      You mean optimist rite? U ve made some good points… Free internet! Lool .. I luved dat in my office too … If some one told me I wud be grateful for internet when I was comin to nigeria for nysc … I wudda laffed hysterically…

  4. loo

    November 7, 2012 at 11:03 am

    I CAN TOTALLY RELATE TO THIS POST EXACTLY WHAT HAPPENED TO ME BUT AM NOT A FOREIGN CORPER.
    I LAUGHED THE ENTIRE TIME I READ THIS CAUSE IT WAS AS IF YOU WERE TELLING MY STORY
    LOOOOL ajebutta otondo.

  5. VAL

    November 7, 2012 at 11:12 am

    mtschewwww

  6. anonymous

    November 7, 2012 at 11:14 am

    your PPA MUST BE A JOKE!! where i did mine we put our brains into use. we were treated like employees, given tasks and expected to present papers on important topics. my service year was great but stressful. least i forget they paid us very well. did i say very well sorry very very well.

  7. shona

    November 7, 2012 at 11:17 am

    Very funny,am was also a 2011 batch C corper,I agree wit ur article to some extent. Its is so nt a waste of time.cos I learnt a lot n made wonder friends

  8. ola

    November 7, 2012 at 11:32 am

    hmmm wat a great information….

  9. chinco

    November 7, 2012 at 11:56 am

    I thought she would have more to say *rolling eyes*. NYSC should (if done properly) be a good experience for all. Encourage patroitism and reduce tribalism, amongst other things. There is room for improvement but I don’t think its a big joke like she said. It depends on what you choose tto take out of it.

  10. RACHAEL

    November 7, 2012 at 12:00 pm

    You also gat me at BROS and not BROWS……..lol
    nice one

  11. sweery

    November 7, 2012 at 12:03 pm

    Nice one! it should have been tagged an Aje butter’s “dairy” though not “guide”

  12. sweery

    November 7, 2012 at 12:04 pm

    Nice one! but i think it should have been tagged an Aje butter’s “dairy” though not “guide”. Nice and entertainig all the same

    • Diary?

      November 7, 2012 at 9:38 pm

      Do you mean Diary?

  13. Berry Choco-Latté

    November 7, 2012 at 12:59 pm

    @sweery: agreed! I had titled it ‘My year as an Aje – Butter Corper’ when I sent it in

    @ chinco, shona and kiks: if you read the last paragraph well, I mentioned the reason why nysc was started in the first place. Promoting diversity, providing work experience and instilling community development in the youth of this country. If the program was run properly, without disregard for putting necessary infrastructures in place; if corps members ALL over were given proper work to do, not time to watch YouTube and a place to charge your phone; if community development service was taken seriously by all corps members; if officials took their jobs seriously; if there were substantial job opportunities available to all corpers, then and only then would I not have anything to complain about. I had fun, made new friends, lived in a different city in Nigeria and met people from all walks of life. It’s not an experience I will forget, but I just wish nysc lived up to its full potential.

  14. ArabianPrincess

    November 7, 2012 at 1:10 pm

    My dear, irrespective of year and century, its deemed good manners to use your right hand to give friends, family and even foes watever it is U wanna pass across. Its part of our culture and U wont be excused cuz U lived in the States for 14years. As for NYSC, twas horrific when I got to camp, served in Gombe and my nose bled for 3weeks, as an economist, I worked in a HIV/AIDS Facility as a counsellor and I loved every bit of it. Others may have bad experiences but then I still regard it as 1year of faffing!

    • t

      November 7, 2012 at 2:43 pm

      So, how does giving elders things with the right hand indicate respect? If that same ‘elder’ was given N100,000 with the left hand will he/she deny it? PSCHEW. Yeah I know tis the culture in Nigeria but it is so unfounded and stupid (in my opinion)

    • Jessica Lin

      November 7, 2012 at 5:42 pm

      Totally agree with you.

    • Idak

      November 7, 2012 at 5:44 pm

      What is stupid about that (even in your view)? I had an Ivy League professor insist that anyone entering his class must remove any sort of cap from their head before entering. Nothing stupid about that either. This idea of thumbing down every thing Nigerian and African is slightly irritating. It does not matter whether you are giving the elder a million pounds or 5 cents, using your left hand smacks of cultural insensitivity. I’ll love to hear what you find stupid about that and i will give you at least two examples of western acts that are in the same vein but you sure don’t find stupid.

    • Ekalor

      November 7, 2012 at 6:55 pm

      My sister is left handed. So if she forgets to use her right hand to give you something, she is rude??????? Please… GOD made southpaws… If people cant deal with that. WELL TOO BAD. So over all these things about respect or no respect.
      By the way telling people to take off their base ball caps isnt the same thing as being born left handed… No body is worth the stress.

    • fairweatherfriendnot

      November 8, 2012 at 12:40 pm

      Idak, i totally agree with you..

    • t

      November 9, 2012 at 8:20 am

      Hmmm…@ Idak. I reiterate, IT IS STUPID AND UNFOUNDED. I am not one to accept whatever is thrown at me just like that. Yeah, if you professor asks me to take off my cap/hat, I will ask him to give me a good reason for that and if it does not make sense, too bad. Why I am against the Nigerian context (afterall, Nigeria is the only country whose tradition I am most familiar with) is that Nigerians operate on DOUBLE STANDARDS and it pisses me off. Like I said, will an elderly person complain if given substantial money with the left hand? NO. Let’s talk about other traditions. Why would I be chided for not kneeling down when I greet an elderly person but a ‘foreigner’ is allowed to go free? Oh because he/she was not raised in Nigeria? What about Nigerians not raised in Nigeria? Why do we get chided and told we lack respect? If something is really your culture, then it should apply to all. Regardless of circumstances or situations. At least in core UAE cities, women, irrespective of where they are from are all expected to cover up . PLEASE!!!

  15. mhonill

    November 7, 2012 at 1:32 pm

    Looooool
    I’m a Batch A 2012 corper and i can say its one of the best years of my life. Registration at camp was stressful and the fact that we were made to say under the sun most times. But in all, my stay at the camp was fun that at the end of the 3weeks, i wished it could continue.
    My PPA is not the best here in Ogun state but i have an amazing boss. And yes, very grateful too because of the free internet thing.. Clearance days, I’m always favored. I hardly go for CDS tho but its fun anytime i attend. I’ve been enjoying my service year. I’m happy and i count my self blessed by God to be part of this.
    The only thing i don’t like is the sun tanning.

  16. Oluwaseun

    November 7, 2012 at 1:42 pm

    i dunno bout ya but my camp was sooo fun

  17. sweery

    November 7, 2012 at 2:02 pm

    @Berry-choco latte, ok good den

  18. GREAT ARTICLE!!!

    November 7, 2012 at 2:03 pm

    Great Write-up!

    I Lost Hope in Nigeria like you and Wanted to Leave but came to a Realization. I Realized that I had the Wrong Expectations of Nigeria. We are not the “Established” Generation (like Europe, US, Australia etc) instead we are the “Builder” Generation (like the West in the 19th Century or China in the 80s).

    And I Learnt that if I wanted to be have a country like the West, then I should go back to the West, but if I wanted to Build a Country then Nigeria was the Place for me.

    Unfortunately due to the Failures of our Past, we do not have the Benefit of Living in a “Established” Country, but Instead have to Build it. That is how I have Rationalized things to myself. I do not Love Nigeria at its Present state, infact I hate it and I learnt that they were Two ways to Change things. Through Business and Politics.

    1)Business – By starting companies that can Develop Nigeria through either catering to Needs by Providing good and services that we don’t have or Developing resources that Nigeria already has. This can range from the big like starting companies that provide better infrastructure like power, transportation, technology to the tiny like setting up niche cafes, galleries bars or delis like are in the west.
    2)Politics – by developing our Movements form mere Noise making to Political entities that has detailed consensus Plans with Endorsed Candidates and Lobbies Policies that can affect all of our Lives for the Better.

    Well, that’s how I have decided to see things. I Hope that this Helps.

    • fairweatherfriendnot

      November 8, 2012 at 12:46 pm

      I support the 2nd. In Nigeria today, we need young and intellectual minds to be involved in politics in the way we hope to build our nation. It’s going to be very (almost) impossible to take over from the current fold of politicians and ruling class, but consistency and persistence and large support from fellow youths will pay off.

  19. hmm

    November 7, 2012 at 2:05 pm

    I totally enjoyed my service year and I got my first job through the contact I made in the state I served. I was determined to develop an open mind, I told my folks I wasn’t going to ‘arrange’ my posting (our leaders are not the only corrupt ones) but if I was posted to the north, then I wouldn’t go. I was assigned to the state secretariate, but rather than sit around doing nothing like the others, I found a school to teach in. My father was already talking about speaking to whoever to get me to a better place but no, I was just going to teach. I was paid N2,500 monthly in addition to the monthly allowee. 2 parents came to me to arrange extra lessons at home (twice a week) for their kids, of course not for free, and I gladly agreed. I was also warehouse keeper for the company that later employed me back in Lagos as a customer service officer, all I had to do was open warehouse for the supplier to drop their supplies once a week and I was paid. I never had to ask my parents for a kobo throughout my service year, in fact, having served in the foodbasket of the nation, I was sure to send enough foodstuff home. Teaching in a primary school also meant I had some time on my hands to do other things, I visited new places and got some exposure for myself. I was also very active in my CDS group, we organised seminars in secondary schools and spoke to kids about careers, I was amazed at the amount of kids that developed interest in Advertising & PR (my field) when I was done with my speech. In essence, I can confidently say I was able to fulfil the requirements of NYSC in my time. I served in 2008. I’m not St Theresa, but I’m a proud Nigerian!

  20. BLESSING

    November 7, 2012 at 2:10 pm

    NYSC IS A BIG JOKE.I NEVR WENT TO CAMP OR CDS BUT I GOT MY CERTIFICATE…MY FRNDS WHO CARRIED IT ON THIER HEAD AS GOVERNMENT WORK HAD ISSUES WIF CO ORDINATORS

    • Cici

      April 29, 2016 at 9:31 am

      Hi Blessing, I am interested to know how you avoided the CDs and all the other weekly/monthly signing stuff, I do not want to have to go for all that but I don’t know how to go about it. I am registered in the current batch, I managed to avoid camp but I heard that I will have to attend the CDs. Thanks a lot

  21. hmm

    November 7, 2012 at 2:15 pm

    Oh, did I mention I had the time of my life!!! organising and attending concerts, fashion shows, parties, travelling, meeting the most amazing people, the locals were fantastic. Some of the friends I made even came all the way to my village to attend my Mum’s funeral 2 years later.

  22. Soraya

    November 7, 2012 at 2:58 pm

    I could not help laughing and laughing my stomach out at this article! I was supposed to be going for NYSC after so many years overseas- I am thinking of doing it, if only for insurance purposes!

  23. GREAT ARTICLE

    November 7, 2012 at 2:59 pm

    Great Write-up!

    I Lost Hope in Nigeria like you and Wanted to Leave but came to a Realization. I Realized that I had the Wrong Expectations of Nigeria. We are not the “Established” Generation (like Europe, US, Australia etc) instead we are the “Builder” Generation (like the West in the 19th Century or China in the 80s).

    And I Learnt that if I wanted to be have a country like the West, then I should go back to the West, but if I wanted to Build a Country then Nigeria was the Place for me.

    Unfortunately due to the Failures of our Past, we do not have the Benefit of Living in a “Established” Country, but Instead have to Build it. That is how I have Rationalized things to myself. I do not Love Nigeria at its Present state, infact I hate it and I learnt that they were Two ways to Change things. Through Business and Politics.

    1)Business – By starting companies that can Develop Nigeria through either catering to Needs by Providing good and services that we don’t have or Developing resources that Nigeria already has. This can range from the big like starting companies that provide better infrastructure like power, transportation, technology to the tiny like setting up niche cafes, galleries bars or delis like are in the west.
    2)Politics – by developing our Movements form mere Noise making to Political entities that has detailed consensus Plans with Endorsed Candidates and Lobbies Policies that can affect all of our Lives for the Better.

    Well, that’s how I have decided to see things. I Hope that this Helps.

  24. Triangle

    November 7, 2012 at 3:10 pm

    I miss my PPA cos that’s d only idea I have in my head of what a standard office should look like. Corpers weren’t treated any different from Staff. Infact a second after 8:30am you sign the latecomers register, and woe betide you that u miss signing out at 4:00pm, next day a query is on your desk frm HR.
    I learnt serious work ethics during my stay there. I did as much work if not more than the Staff there. Its an invaluable experience on my CV which I can defend anywhere, anytime. And to think it’s a FG parastatal here in Abuja.
    Post-service year, I’ve had to unlearn most of the things I acquired frm my PPA. If u resume work by 12noon at my current workplace, you’re quite early. You can skip work anyday you like etc, all these despite the jumbo salaries govt pays.
    I enjoyed my service year and I’m working tirelessly to go back there as a permanent staff, this job despite the pay isn’t challenging. Nuff said

    • NICE!

      November 7, 2012 at 11:03 pm

      That sounds great! Please, where were you assigned/what Parastal were you Working in, if you don’t mind me Asking…

    • Triangle

      November 8, 2012 at 12:49 pm

      Nice It’s the Apex Capital Market regulator in Nigeria

  25. temers

    November 7, 2012 at 3:14 pm

    i can totally relate to the “someone demanded that I use my right hand to hand him something… in 2012, really? “.. i think its soo stupid. im freaking left handed and people assume im being rude when i hand them something with my left hand. Im like no im left handed, its not intentional and when they dont accept the docs in my left hand i simply drop it on the damn table. – IGNORAMUS, they shud tell that to obama, bill clinton.

  26. babe

    November 7, 2012 at 3:24 pm

    Well said,nysc is a waste of time

  27. anidiv777

    November 7, 2012 at 3:35 pm

    I might be going for mine next yr feb and I dread it already

  28. Nosky

    November 7, 2012 at 4:01 pm

    Well, I had a similar NYSC experience as a foreign graduate coming back from the States. I have since gone back. However, I knew what to expect and gladly did my best to blend in and take it all in good faith without complaining too much. Nigeria is still third world after all. But I don’t think ridiculing our culture is right. We give people things with our right hand in Nigeria, that’s our culture and we shouldn’t ridicule our culture. The United States doesn’t have a better culture.

    Anyway, my advise to foreign graduates is that a condescending and stuck up disposition will guarantee that you will not enjoy your NYSC and shows that you are too weak to survive outside your comfort zone.
    I also totally buy the idea that Nigerians should start teaching their children how to stand in a line.

    • HYPOCRITE!!!

      November 7, 2012 at 10:58 pm

      Hold up! So who is Better between You and Her? Somebody who Complains about Nigeria but still stays Build Naija or Somebody who says they put with it and then Flees when NYSC is over? LOL

      Abeg O, Naija is a Backward, Corrupt, Dirty, Unruly, Mismanaged etc We never ever get comfortable/rationalise our Fault. Rather we should Acknowledge and Denounce them and then Work Hard to Fix it.

  29. BonMee

    November 7, 2012 at 4:04 pm

    Dream on!!!, beliv me it would be ur most boring year if u are a productive person, ur best if u love chilling and clubbing though u may not even hv money to do dat sef, oh and beliv me its UNFORGETTABLE

  30. Ngozi

    November 7, 2012 at 4:25 pm

    Thanks for the Information. I plan on coming back to do mine.

  31. Naaaa

    November 7, 2012 at 5:11 pm

    Interesting….where is the link to your blog?

  32. Brixtonbabe

    November 7, 2012 at 5:51 pm

    Ok i don’t get the BROs and BROWS bit lol maybe i am a bit slow. So this essentially means if you want to work in Nigeria as a Nigerian (for those with dual citizenship) you HAVE to do NYSC even after God knows how many years after graduating) So this means a 40 year old person who wants to relocate for work purposes as a Nigerian having lived abroad for 30 years has to do NYSC? WOW what are the chances of being hired as per your other citizenship even though you are of Nigerian background?

  33. i no send

    November 7, 2012 at 6:57 pm

    thank you idak you always make sense

  34. X factor

    November 7, 2012 at 9:29 pm

    If I have the chance to do it again,I ll most definitely choose to serve in Zamfara again and again………that z been one of the best part of my life………..

  35. JUST NOTICED

    November 7, 2012 at 11:02 pm

    Hold up! So who is Better between You and Her? Somebody who Complains about Nigeria but still stays Build Naija or Somebody who says they put with it and thennFlees when NYSC is over? LOL

    Abeg O, Naija is a Backward, Corrupt, Dirty, Unruly, Mismanaged etc We never ever get comfortable/rationalise our Fault. Rather we should Acknowledge and Denounce them and then Work Hard to Fix it.

  36. Kemi

    November 8, 2012 at 12:01 am

    Nysc is a total waste of time. For real! Naija just sucks!

  37. slyyy

    November 8, 2012 at 4:28 am

    personally i tink dis NYSC of a thing is a gud idea but at the same time it shld be treated like an internship kinda tin in d sense that, u shld do be appointed smetin 2 do in ur area of study so that u can gain a lil experience instead of making everi1 teach.. i am a foreign student who just got done with college dis may but the thought of going back to teach in a rural village is smetin i dread so for now, its scratched out of my list until further notice.. i mean i dnt mind sharing my knowledge/ experience with my community but that shld come from me which i ll do in the future by God’s grace but for now am nt buying that government obligation.. i stil ve like 10 more years 2 make up my mind or hopefuli it will be scratched out..

  38. Ada di ora

    December 12, 2012 at 11:27 pm

    Ok for someone who didnt go to a Naija secondary schl, and thus has no WAEC certificate, what serves as a substitute?
    I hear also they asked when you left the country, but if I left at age 11, do they expect me to remember the date?

  39. Ebuka

    December 14, 2015 at 2:12 am

    Nice, write-up i totally agree with ur view, but the program isnt as fun as it used to be back in the days. My friends are getting ready for service and im seriously hoping they get posted to these states

  40. Dinma

    September 13, 2016 at 5:09 am

    was any corp member given extension and how was it made known to them

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