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Jennifer Hudson as Winnie Mandela – Watch the Trailer for the ‘Winnie’ Biopic

BellaNaija.com

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Oscar winner Jennifer Hudson faced criticism when it was announced in late 2009 that she would be portraying South African anti-apartheid activist and ex-wife of Nelson Mandela, Winnie Mandela in a new biopic.

The announcement that Jennifer Hudson and Terrence Howard would be playing the lead roles in the movie incited protests from the Creative Workers Union of South Africa. According to the union’s president, the use of Hollywood actors for key roles in South Africa inspired movies has a counter productive effect on the South African film industry.

There was further controversy when Mrs Madikizela-Mandela herself threatened legal action against the filmmakers as she feared the movie would portray her in a negative light, in her words “character assassination”. That was dismissed when further details on the movie were unveiled at the 2010 Cannes Film Festival.

Despite the furor dying down, many have been keen to see how Jennifer would portray one of Africa’s most polarizing icons.

Now we can judge for ourselves, an extended trailer of the movie has been released and you can view it below. The movie is directed by South African Darrell Roodt, his previous films include Cry, The Beloved Country.
‘Winnie’ is scheduled for release in 2011.

‘Winnie’ – The Extended Trailer

News Source: UK Telegraph | The Hollywood Reporter via Yahoo
Photo Credit: Daily Mail UK

50 Comments

  1. bimbo

    November 17, 2010 at 11:44 am

    loves it!!

  2. Naijamum

    November 17, 2010 at 11:51 am

    Well, we’ll wait and see what the full movie will be like. I do hope the story does not deviate too far from the truth (about exactly what happened behind the scenes).
    Undoubtedly, there will be complaints about how Terrence and Jennifer have been able to truly capture the South African accent.
    However, Winnie remains an icon to me and if this movie contributes in some way to immortalising her name, I will be pleased!

  3. Demilade

    November 17, 2010 at 12:36 pm

    I LOVE HER. HER. SOUTH AFRICA. ACCENT. IS. SOOOO WAAAACK ITS UNBELIEVABLE. SHE REALLY MISSED IT THERE

    • Lrn

      January 12, 2012 at 12:53 pm

      I agree the accent is Bad, we dont sound like. Oh Lord, she sounds nigerian more than south african. Mandela sound more educated than that.

  4. Eseosa

    November 17, 2010 at 2:03 pm

    That accent sounds more Calabar than South African……and Nelson(Terrence sounds even worse)They shd have just used Locals or Well Seasoned actors to tell such a Powerful story of our time…Shikena!!!!!

    I hear 50cent is also going to play Okonkwo in “Things Fall Apart” the Nigerian Epic by Chinua Achebe , his Igbo accent am sure would sound like Patuá, well supposedly that’s a rumour and i really hope that is what it is!!!!!

    • Kémi Penélopê

      November 17, 2010 at 2:47 pm

      I agree w/ you that Hollywood should sometimes use local film actors but trust them to think abt the monetary side first before they even consider putting a nobody in front of the cover of movie promo billboard…
      >>>50cent portray Okonkwo in “Things Fall Apart”…huh? That will be a shocker, in fact, I will only go see the movie b/c just to see the outcome…

    • Sugabelly

      November 17, 2010 at 3:56 pm

      omg haha ha. that would be terrible

    • Sach

      November 18, 2010 at 2:21 pm

      hahahahahhaha…kemi this is hilarious. definetly i’ll love to see how 50cent will look in native attire while holding a cutlass….bwahahahahahahaha

    • teefs

      November 17, 2010 at 3:25 pm

      Its not Chinua Achebe’s Thing Fall Apart 50 cents will be in, its another movie in which he played a cancer patient…that was the role he lost a lot of weight for

    • teefs

      November 17, 2010 at 3:26 pm

      The movie was also called “Things Fall Apart”

    • Jess

      November 17, 2010 at 4:11 pm

      The “things fall apart” that 50 cent will be in has nothing to do with Chinua Achebe’s book. I do agree on the local actors thing though. From what I see the movie does not look promising, but we wait and see.

    • Beediva

      November 18, 2010 at 6:54 am

      lmao at 50c playing okonkwo…..

    • mbabazi

      November 18, 2010 at 7:26 am

      are you joking about 50 cent.thats ridiculous.

    • Nneka

      November 25, 2010 at 10:01 pm

      LOLZ. 50 cents ko….50 kobo ni…. They are going to need all the concealer they can possibly find to cover up all his tatoos while he docks only a wrapper from waist below. LOLZ

  5. Sugabelly

    November 17, 2010 at 3:56 pm

    Are there no actors in South Africa???? Terrence Howard as Nelson Mandela ke?

  6. Waha

    November 17, 2010 at 4:25 pm

    50 will make a very agile okonkwo….his acting sha i dont know, its just like saying Kanye shd act(disastrous!) Its d accent im waiting for. Meanwhile I just LOOOOVE Jennifer. I dont like the aging they did on her tho. It looks like those old eddie murphy ones from coming to america

  7. Chibaby

    November 17, 2010 at 4:56 pm

    The fake accents aint doing it for me. Why couldn’t they use local actors who have the accent. Sorry I won’t be seeing it.

    • mbabazi

      November 18, 2010 at 8:06 am

      for the accents they should have hired the same coach as the one who helped jill scott pull off a perfect accent in the The No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency ” she is exellent in it. you would not tell she is american.

  8. Temiloluwa Adebayo

    November 17, 2010 at 5:31 pm

    In Last King of Scotland, the same thing. In Blood Diamonds, the same thing. In Blood and Oil, the same thing. They just sprinkle a bit of natives in to make it look a bit real. I guess these big names brings more money to the investors than some unknown African actor. Oh well!

    I’m sure it will make an interesting watch though.

    http://temiville.wordpress.com/

    • ginger

      November 17, 2010 at 8:49 pm

      I dont agree with it but you are right.At the end of the day it is first and foremost a business.They have investors to think about & finances to consider.So to rake in the most money, they will use the elements that will bring in the most money..hence, American actors & actresses.

  9. Holajaze

    November 17, 2010 at 6:22 pm

    Hey,for God sake why can’t we use our African acts for d African roles in d african movie where necessary,dis ll really portray negative effects on South Africa & also Africa if not done in dat way.SALUTE

  10. myne Whitman

    November 17, 2010 at 6:49 pm

    Winnie remains an inspiration and I hope Jen Hudson whom I also admire, does justice to her in the movie. The accents are funny sha…

  11. Temi

    November 17, 2010 at 8:42 pm

    I don’t think it’ll be much to watch. Call me biased but Sophie Okonedo’s Winnie depiction is yet to be beaten. She was phenomenal. I don’t see the same fiery passion in Jennifer.

    • mariaah

      November 17, 2010 at 10:37 pm

      I haven’t seen Sophie’s and haven’t seen any of her work but Jenifer hudson’s got “fiery passion”.. Dream girls was outstanding and the bbe won an Oscar!! She’s perfect in her own right.

    • Nkem

      November 21, 2010 at 12:37 pm

      She’s got fiery passion yes, but it doesn’t come out in this movie probably because she had the double pressure of being a strong character and acting with a foreign accent. Also dont forget that a key part of her strength in Dreamgirls was the fact that she got to sing… You should watch Sophie as Winnie and then compare. I’m sure then you will agree with me

  12. Olu

    November 17, 2010 at 10:12 pm

    If Hollywood is financing the film they have the write to cast whomever they feel will help sell the movie and make a profit. We all know how expensive it is to make a movie, it’s not just a creative industry, it’s an industry that has to be profitable or else you lose investors and your ability to make any further movies. If Africans don’t like the way Hollywood represents them in their stories in an Hollywood movie then Africa and Africans need to invest in their own movie industry and their own talent. Irrespective of the importance of the story being told you need a cast that will attract a global audience for a movie to make a profit. African actors, apart from the ones in the diaspora, need to understand that for African stories to be told by Africans they need to think globally and start auditioning for roles on a global stage to raise their profile and showcase their talent. Then at least Hollywood will have options when it comes to casting roles for African related stories. Stop complaining about Hollywood and start supporting those raising the bar in African made films of quality with your buying power as a consumer. I can’t emphasize quality enough, buy rubbish movies and you encourage them to continue to make rubbish movies. Give Hollywood a break, you need to be thankful that they are at least trying to tell African stories.

    • Givemeabreak!

      November 18, 2010 at 4:18 am

      Thankful for what? Look at this sell out negro! How does Hollywood telling our story put food on the table for the average African or pay their bills? What does it benefit me as an individual if they choose to tell our stories or not? Some people just like to -kiss the west all the time. Typical colonial mentality! Mtshew!

    • Olu

      November 18, 2010 at 4:17 pm

      Sell out Negro? My friend you show your level of ignorance and lack of intelligence by your very words. Of course its not Hollywood’s job to financially support the average African but they have. Allow me to break it down for you.

      Hollywood went out and found a good story to tell, one that had not been told on a global scale. They put their money behind it came to South Africa and hired a South African director and tens or might even be hundreds of South Africans (average African in your words) to be crew members, extras and supporting cast members. They paid taxes to the South African Government for the privilege of shooting in their country not to mention the taxes that would be generated by the South Africans working on the film or the extra money that flows into the local economy as a result of having a Hollywood budget film shoot on your doorsteps. I’m talking hotel bookings, restaurants, transportation, administration, equipment hire, manpower and the increased tourism from the exposure the film brings to the local area. I’m sure if you go and ask the “average African” living in the area the film was shot they would tell you that they did in fact benefit from it financially or otherwise.

      Oh! And let me not forget the fact that the Hollywood machine can take this story global, to area’s of the World that may not have heard of or know the full story. You may not understand the importance of this but for people who have been influenced by hearing the story or the struggles of others and have gone on to improve their own views or their approach to the struggles they face I think its very important. For example Martin Luther King Junior adopted his peaceful none violence protest against racism in America from what he learned from Ghandi’s experience in India.

      If you cant see the bigger picture pull your head out of your own ass and buy a clue. If you don’t have anything positive or intelligent to say then shut up and let those who have understanding talk. Because when you make comments like:
      “Look at this sell out negro!”
      “What does it benefit me as an individual if they choose to tell our stories or not?”
      “Some people just like to -kiss the west all the time. Typical colonial mentality!”

      You give a bad impression of us to anyone reading your words. So please… STOP! Think beyond your own self-interest next time.

  13. nastynas

    November 18, 2010 at 12:01 am

    Seems wack. I have no interest….

  14. dabusta

    November 18, 2010 at 1:31 am

    blah blah blah!……am looking forward to the movie fake accent or not.Love Jennifer Hudson and Terrence Howard is not a bad actor either.

  15. ugo

    November 18, 2010 at 4:49 am

    for a movie titled “Winnie”, there sure is a lot of focus on Mandela!… at least, from what the trailer shows

  16. ugo

    November 18, 2010 at 4:51 am

    heck to the freaking NOOO! fifty play Okonkwo??? that will be a shame to my people

  17. Eseosa

    November 18, 2010 at 8:59 am

    @OLU …While I hear your views on financing a project, i refuse to be grateful they are investing in my history, (Re your last sentence).

    Firstly let’s acknowledge the enormity of this story .This is just not an average South African or African who has a story to be told, while we all have our own songs, this is one story that unifies us as a Nation, a country a continent.

    Mandela is Iconic and so is Winnie.

    It is not a Problem that American Actors are portraying the Mandelas, But the chosen actors in question. Dream girls was remarkable cos Jennifer was telling her story, a familiar story, the story of an American.
    I am half Nigerian and let me tell you if you ask me to play Emotan ,I will blow you away just because it is my story ,I understand the people ,the culture, I might not speak the Benin language fluently, but I can get the accent down to the pronunciation of ohely (Oil.)And say Shege/waka with depth 

    Terrence in the same token is a brilliant actor and also very good at interpreting roles he is familiar with, roles that easily an American who has spent one day in Bronx can relate too.

    Have you seen Social Network did you know any of the actors before you watched it? sometimes investing in new talent even if they are Americans makes business sense, after all a movie with popular actors which turns out to be a flop and makes financial loss makes no financial sense to me, The actors in question lose credibility, the story looses substance.

    Have you seen Totsi, it is a typical south African story told and directed by south Africans with western influence (Money ), The movie won an Oscar , the lead actress today is the face of L’Oreal and has gone on to act numerous local films /soapies. The fact she is not Mrs Bond or a popular American actress shouldn’t be a yardstick of her success, not every actor wants to move to Hollywood, we as Africans have to stand together and support our own and carve a niche for ourselves. This whole Americanization” must stop.

    Leonardo in blood diamonds accent wasn’t a 100% but deserved applaud for effort, even Eddie Murphy in coming to America delivered a better African accent. Let’s not even make mention off non Americans that act brilliant American movies and get the accent right…MEDIOCRITY IS NOT EXCUSABLE

    At the end of the day, no matter how brilliant both actors are if they cannot interpret their respective roles ,or at least make it believable then they have done a bad job of it.

  18. Eseosa

    November 18, 2010 at 9:00 am

    @OLU …While I hear your views on financing a project, i refuse to be THANKFUL they are investing in my history, (Re your last sentence).

    Firstly let’s acknowledge the enormity of this story .This is just not an average South African or African who has a story to be told, while we all have our own songs, this is one story that unifies us as a Nation, a country a continent.

    Mandela is Iconic and so is Winnie.

    It is not a Problem that American Actors are portraying the Mandelas, But the chosen actors in question. Dream girls was remarkable cos Jennifer was telling her story, a familiar story, the story of an American.
    I am half Nigerian and let me tell you if you ask me to play Emotan ,I will blow you away just because it is my story ,I understand the people ,the culture, I might not speak the Benin language fluently, but I can get the accent down to the pronunciation of ohely (Oil.)And say Shege/waka with depth 

    Terrence in the same token is a brilliant actor and also very good at interpreting roles he is familiar with, roles that easily an American who has spent one day in Bronx can relate too.

    Have you seen Social Network did you know any of the actors before you watched it? sometimes investing in new talent even if they are Americans makes business sense, after all a movie with popular actors which turns out to be a flop and makes financial loss makes no financial sense to me, The actors in question lose credibility, the story looses substance.

    Have you seen Totsi, it is a typical south African story told and directed by south Africans with western influence (Money ), The movie won an Oscar , the lead actress today is the face of L’Oreal and has gone on to act numerous local films /soapies. The fact she is not Mrs Bond or a popular American actress shouldn’t be a yardstick of her success, not every actor wants to move to Hollywood, we as Africans have to stand together and support our own and carve a niche for ourselves. This whole Americanization” must stop.

    Leonardo in blood diamonds accent wasn’t a 100% but deserved applaud for effort, even Eddie Murphy in coming to America delivered a better African accent. Let’s not even make mention off non Americans that act brilliant American movies and get the accent right…MEDIOCRITY IS NOT EXCUSABLE

    At the end of the day, no matter how brilliant both actors are if they cannot interpret their respective roles ,or at least make it believable then they have done a bad job of it.

    • Karimah

      November 18, 2010 at 1:49 pm

      I concur… tru talk

    • Olu

      November 18, 2010 at 6:37 pm

      Eseosa
      “The enormity of the story” as you put it should have been the catalyst to spur South Africans, their Film Industry and their Government to come together and make sure the story was financed, produced and told correctly by them for a the World to see. But they did not and if Hollywood had not come along the best we would have had is the story told by an independent filmmaker with the best of intentions but lacking the finances or distribution power to do the story justice.
      Personally I’m thankful for Hollywood because there have been a number of other African stories that I would not be aware of if not for them. If you notice I made no reference to the actors cast for the movie or the authenticity of their accents because if you understand the way Hollywood and film making function that would be the least of your worries. The creative minds behind the film probably had the best of intentions and would have liked to make it as authentic in every way possible. But if you image for a moment a producers pitching this story to you for financing and you as the head of a Studio answerable to share holders and trying to keep the Studio profitable. You like the story, you can see the appeal and selling points then the producer tells you the names of the South African actors they would like to cast for the lead. Your first thoughts might be who are they and what have they done before? The producer tells you they are big in South Africa and all over Africa, very well know like the Brand and Angelina of Africa, they will make the movie more authentic to Africans.

      Now you as this big shot Studio Executive that has never been to Africa and all that you know of the place are the poverty you see on TV, the piracy you hear about losing you money from previous movies and the figures showing the ratio of revenue from past movies released on the continent in relation to the rest of the World. Do you really think that in that situation you would agree to take the risk (of your career, your reputation) with money you are responsible for in other to please African viewers, who are a fraction of the overall audience? I think not! And frankly “US” African should stop feeling hard done by when it come to Hollywood telling our story. Hollywood has always followed the same formula when it comes to making movies and that is to hedge their bets on the ability of the lead cast to draw attention to the movie. Every filmmaker out there, that has every had dealings with Hollywood, will tell you to forget the fact that you have a good story what concerns Hollywood is how do we sell it to the masses. And the answer has always been the same, tie it to the backs of famous faces and use their popularity to sell the movie. It happens in all Film Industries, why do you think the same group of Nigerian actors are prevalent in Nollywood films.

      If Jennifer Hudson were not successful on the reality show that brought her to the limelight she would not have been cast in Dream Girls. And if she had not done so well in Dream Girls they would not have cast her for the role of Winnie. Film financiers don’t care about the authenticity of a film all that concerns them is the bottom line. I can’t emphasize that enough. We can’t blame the creative people, the director or the actors; they’ve been giving a job to do and are doing it to the best of their ability. Mind you there are very few actors that can get an accent spot on and maintain it take after take through the duration of however long it takes to shoot all their scenes. If everyone that has been focusing on the accent knows how difficult it is to make films they would not be making the negative comments about this film from watching the trailer alone.

      My point is that WE Africans need to understand how the industry works so that we can begin to tell our stories not just by us for us but by us for the whole World to See, Hear and Understand African. In the process we’ll create an industry that can provide jobs and financial freedom to the people not to mention what it would add to the economy. The west coast of America moved away from an economy based on Gold, Oil and other nature material into a thriving economy fueled by the entertainment industry. Lets stop complaining about them and lets go out and build our own.

  19. Lepa

    November 18, 2010 at 10:14 am

    @ Eseosa….Correct talk!!!

  20. steezy

    November 18, 2010 at 10:29 am

    The Accent is really a no-no

  21. Mina

    November 18, 2010 at 10:39 am

    Honestly, I disagree! I would rather appreciate the story first…there’s a story worthy of double-note! This is the reason the story has been put into movie again and again. Its worthy of note to remind us of an honorable man and woman.

  22. eve

    November 18, 2010 at 1:37 pm

    olu well spoken, eseosa your history-why don’t u make a movie out of it then and cast your own acts

    • London Lin

      November 18, 2010 at 2:41 pm

      Eve, read and understand what Esosa is saying, so in all of that , it is just her own history you can pick, she is right we all have our own songs and history ,but some stories are simply iconic ……abi you mean u dont have any history or story???

  23. Kémi Penélopê

    November 18, 2010 at 3:03 pm

    Plz don’t get me wrong I do like to see some familiar faces in films, you know, once in a while, however, it’s time Africans raises their own voices to tell its own stories…
    Yes, the western world may not care to listen to what we have to say but eventually, they will have to listen b/c even the Elephant, Giraffe, Zebras …will raise their voices, along with the people of Africa to speak of this great continent

  24. Ngozi

    November 19, 2010 at 1:44 pm

    Danny Glover would always be Mandela in my mind……

    • Nneka

      November 25, 2010 at 10:07 pm

      I agree! Spot on.

  25. caramel_drops

    November 26, 2010 at 12:11 am

    am not feeling the flame btw hudson and terrace…

  26. Pott54

    January 25, 2011 at 9:33 pm

    If Africans wanted Africans to tell the story of Nelson or Winnie Mandella–THEN WHY DIDN’T SOMEONE IN THAT COUNTRY create/produce/finance the movie? You don’t hear African-Americans complaining about Africans or people of African descent like Idris Alba playing roles clearly designed for African-Americans. And I don’t care what movie you make were a different language or dialect is required–the actors SELDOM get it “spot on”–be it Irish, Italian, etc. People complained about Al Pacino’s Cuban accent in “ScarFace.” And white American actors SELDOM get the British accent right when playing Brit ish characters such as the Queen. It still doesn’t mean the movie or even the actors can’t be effective in telling the story.

  27. JAKES JOHN

    February 24, 2011 at 8:38 pm

    AS A MOVIE EXTRA FOR THE WINNIE FILM, I DID NOT BENEFIT ANYTHING. STILL DID NOT RECEIVE PAYMENT AFTER MONTHS!!

  28. JEAN

    April 25, 2011 at 8:46 am

    SOPHIE OKONEDO!!!! ENOUGH SAID!!!

  29. LULU

    June 3, 2011 at 12:13 pm

    I am so dissapointed, both Jennifer and Terrence did not do the characters justice. We’ve seen S.A apartheid movies “Cry the beloved country” okd movie but better acting

  30. TRW

    October 23, 2011 at 6:21 pm

    Why is the African culture notorious for having a “crab” mentality? The crab mentality is the mind-set of pulling a person down simply out of spite & jealousy of their success.

    I completely agree with “Eseosa”. The story of Winnie Mandela would never have been told on such a grand scale had it not been for the Hollywood Industry. People complain about not benefiting from the movie but where is gratitude for the story that is being told? What have you contributed to the making of this movie, besides perhaps being an extra? Hollywood is doing you a favor by telling the story of this icon yet controversial figure, Winnie Mandela. Why hasn’t anyone from Africa produced a movie like this and distributed it on a world-wide platform? The answer is simple….MONEY! You couldn’t have done any better because (1) You don’t have the money (2) You don’t have the resources (3) You don’t have the audience.

    Africans are known for the belief that someone owes them something. Givemeabreak asked, “How does Hollywood telling our story put food on the table for the average African or pay their bills?” As if Hollywood is responsible for feeding you & paying your bills. My question to you is, “what are you doing to help yourself?” The African people as a NATION needs to rise up & do something for themselves, come together and let go of the “slave” mentality. Nobody owes you anything but you as a people owe yourselves everything. The way you give to yourself in this case, is to support actors like Jennifer & Terrence for playing these roles, not by verbally abusing them with words like “sell out negro”. What has he done to sell-out? If you are referring to him being married to a white woman, perhaps you should get your facts straight about him. He was born from an interracial marriage, his mother is white & his father is black. He is a mix-race man and even if he wasn’t mixed people have the right in this country to marry whom ever they choose, that doesn’t make them a “sell-out” as you put it. Black people need to get over their prejudice because all your doing is spewing your…. FEAR!

    Support the movie and you will open the door for someone to support your dreams and efforts if you have any. I think the movie will be powerfully & wonderfully told, so what if the accents are not completely on track!!! I would love to hear your American accent. They get points in my book for effort. Thank you Hollywood for doing this!

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