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House of Deola presents Komole Kandids Series 1 | BellaNaija Weddings interviews The Designer

BellaNaija Weddings

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Liya - Ivory boned corset with diaphanous divides and Ivory “winged” skirt. Corset and skirt panelled with Komole Kandids Forest motif.

2016 marks a new era for House of Deola (the brand was formerly known as ‘Deola Sagoe‘) with the launch of its wedding collection – Komole Kandids Series 1! At its core it is classically Nigerian, with its use of local fabrics.

BellaNaija Weddings asks the award-winning virtuoso Deola Ade Ojo a few questions about her inspiration behind the collection, and her personal love for weddings.

The Komole Kandids Series 1, in the Komole range for the House of Deola, presents an assemblage of designs for bridal wear drawing upon the mood and romance evoked by royalty and royal weddings through the ages. Deola says.

I imagine a Komole bride. She is independent and in charge, but still demure and gentle like the current Duchess of Cambridge Kate Middleton… She honors everyone that looks at her with her way and that wow Komole creation! …She is the new light in all their lives!”

Over 12 years of research and development are ingrained into the Komole range (the original collection was launched in 2012), the result of which is a profoundly refreshing take on Aso-Oke and the look of the modern bride.

The Komole textile form addresses the same ideological desires that led to the development of lace in Europe in centuries past. Today lace has its parallel, in many ways it’s usurper, in this House of Deola signature style of Aso-Oke fabric – a fabric at the heart of a nation’s identity and consciousness.

There is no need anymore to have Aso-Oke and a Lace outfit as two answers to an occasion’s fashion demands… we have combined both into one and by so doing transcended, making the new creation even better than the sum of its parts. The new fabric motifs and the fashions that we have formed them into elevate the wearer to princess level, while still keeping her culturally grounded – I believe that this is what true class and elegance is about, shining in the form of a glow rather than a tinselly shine”
Deola Ade Ojo

The Komole range and Komole signature motifs have taken “occasion outfits” to a new fashion apex with unparalleled painstaking craftsmanship and attention to detail. The colour palette is a continuum from pastels to jewel tones, with iridescent sheen arising from silk ‘shot-through’ Aso-Oke weaves. Silhouettes flatter into a demure hourglass shape with floor length dresses that stagger the onlooker.

The Komole Kandids collection also heralds a shift for the House of Deola family of brands, as the fashion house enters a new level of dialogue with its audience and fans through social media platforms.

As Easter’s end beckons and the accompanying wedding season begins, the House of Deola promises a second series of Komole Kandids to be launched on the 6th of March.

Here’s the first series, with 10 designs.

***

Komole Kandids Series 1_House of Deola_Aso Oke_Nigerian Wedding_BellaNaija2

Liya – Ivory boned corset with diaphanous divides and Ivory “winged” skirt. Corset and skirt panelled with Komole Kandids Forest motif.

Komole Kandids Series 1_House of Deola_Aso Oke_Nigerian Wedding_BellaNaija3

Imani - One shoulder celadon floor length dress with attached ruched ‘ipele’. Dress patterned with Komole Kandids Forest motif.

Imani – One shoulder celadon floor length dress with attached ruched ‘ipele’.
Dress patterned with Komole Kandids Forest motif.

Komole Kandids Series 1_House of Deola_Aso Oke_Nigerian Wedding_BellaNaija5

Adeola - Ivory and Brass gilded Iro and Buba. Iro and Buba patterned with Komole Kandids Forest on Classic motif. Gele edged with Komole Kandids Forest motif. Iro and Buba is finished with signature Deola “cadeaux bow-back”.

Adeola – Ivory and Brass gilded Iro and Buba.
Iro and Buba patterned with Komole Kandids Forest on Classic motif.
Gele edged with Komole Kandids Forest motif.
Iro and Buba is finished with signature Deola “cadeaux bow-back”.

Komole Kandids Series 1_House of Deola_Aso Oke_Nigerian Wedding_BellaNaija7

Salma - Emerald floor length dress with attached peplum belt frill. Dress and belt frill patterned with Komole Kandids Forest motif.

Salma – Emerald floor length dress with attached peplum belt frill.
Dress and belt frill patterned with Komole Kandids Forest motif.

Komole Kandids Series 1_House of Deola_Aso Oke_Nigerian Wedding_BellaNaija8 Komole Kandids Series 1_House of Deola_Aso Oke_Nigerian Wedding_BellaNaija10

Alexandra - Plum ribbed corset with fringe fascia and floor length skirt. Fringe fascia is patterned with Komole Kandids Azalea motif.

Alexandra – Plum ribbed corset with fringe fascia and floor length skirt.
Fringe fascia is patterned with Komole Kandids Azalea motif.

Komole Kandids Series 1_House of Deola_Aso Oke_Nigerian Wedding_BellaNaija12 Komole Kandids Series 1_House of Deola_Aso Oke_Nigerian Wedding_BellaNaija13

Maxima & Ines - Azure cropped ‘Kimo-Buba’ and Azure pencil skirt. Skirt is patterned with Komole Kandids Clover motif.

Maxima & Ines – Azure cropped ‘Kimo-Buba’ and Azure pencil skirt.
Skirt is patterned with Komole Kandids Clover motif.

Komole Kandids Series 1_House of Deola_Aso Oke_Nigerian Wedding_BellaNaija15

Eleanor - Coral A-line dress with soft shoulder straps. Dress is patterned with Komole Kandids Daisy motif.

Eleanor – Coral A-line dress with soft shoulder straps.
Dress is patterned with Komole Kandids Daisy motif.

Komole Kandids Series 1_House of Deola_Aso Oke_Nigerian Wedding_BellaNaija17

Elizabeth - Cherry blossom pink floor length dress with fringe fascia cape. Fringe fascia cape is patterned with Komole Kandids Azalea motif, and skirt is panelled with Komole Kandids Azalea motif.

Elizabeth – Cherry blossom pink floor length dress with fringe fascia cape.
Fringe fascia cape is patterned with Komole Kandids Azalea motif, and skirt is panelled with Komole Kandids Azalea motif.

Komole Kandids Series 1_House of Deola_Aso Oke_Nigerian Wedding_BellaNaija19

Mena - Apricot and platinum “Double wrapper” style ensemble. Patterned with Komole Kandids Nectar motif. Double Wrapper is finished with signature Deola “cadeaux bow-back”.

Mena – Apricot and platinum “Double wrapper” style ensemble.
Patterned with Komole Kandids Nectar motif.
Double Wrapper is finished with signature Deola “cadeaux bow-back”.

Komole Kandids Series 1_House of Deola_Aso Oke_Nigerian Wedding_BellaNaija21

Anastasia - Ultramarine blouson and floor length ‘Roses’ skirt. Blouson is patterned with Komole Kandids Azalea motif.

Anastasia – Ultramarine blouson and floor length ‘Roses’ skirt.
Blouson is patterned with Komole Kandids Azalea motif.

Komole Kandids Series 1_House of Deola_Aso Oke_Nigerian Wedding_BellaNaija23

We asked Deola four questions – from her love for weddings to using Nigerian fabrics, to the innovative fabric (and style), Komole.

1. What do you like about weddings? 

Deola Ade Ojo: Who doesn’t like a good wedding?! It is a fuss filled day, or couple of days, to be sure, but it is to be enjoyed, and the brides and grooms have the attention of the world fixed on them. It is a major high point in the life of any woman.

The planning; the togetherness; the moments to be remembered for a lifetime, captured in photos, these days enshrined on social media; all of this is and should be beautiful.

I just imagine a Komole Kandids bride. She is independent and in charge, but still demure and gentle. She honors everyone that looks at her with her way and that wow Komole creation! I see her in my head, with her eyes never quite rising to meet anyone’s gaze directly save her betrothed… and everyone from groom to the mother in law, to aunties and uncles, just wish to pet her and welcome her, as they themselves realize that she is the new light in all their lives!

On The Collection
2. Komole is a textile innovation as well as a fashion style – can you give us your thoughts on how Nigerian innovations like this can be placed onto the world stage?

Deola: We just need grounded pride – not arrogance. We need the world’s feedback on our innovations. Governmental bodes both local and Federal are lagging behind in realizing what our returns could be.

You can’t play on the world stage without the right back up and the right agenda. Even though Komole is my innovation, I do not mind it being branded as a national export product – with my permission of course!

3. The details in the dresses are fascinating can you tell us a bit about the detailing in this Komole collection. For instance, the motifs have names.

Deola: It started off with one and now God knows how many we have, but we release them according to their connection to a time or simply when the mood grabs me. I’m a girl at heart so I like feminine motifs. I do like to explore though so sometimes what I land on, people initially think “what are you doing!” but when it is all resolved they see what had drawn me in that particular direction.

Komole designs are our innovated answer to lace fabrics. As major consumers of this fabric style, it’s only right that we develop our own. But like I said, I didn’t go into this with purely commerce in mind, it was never about me producing a cheaper or locally made lace copycat fabric. Never that! I decided to start with the fabrics’ ideology and develop from there using Aso Oke.

And that is why what we have made is original African in every sense. I hope the powers that be will get behind this so that we can begin exporting soon. The applications are too numerous to mention.

4. Lastly, What inspired you this time round, creating this Komole collection?
What woman did you have in mind and where do you see her wearing your designs?

Deola: My inspiration flows from the desire to get people to buy Nigerian all the way… and I’m always interested in what that means right now – today.

I believe in the contemporary African, who, whilst being a modern cosmopolitanite, appreciates her or his African culture, look and heritage. I want our products, our fashion, to surpass international standards, so I always strive to innovate and refresh; to make African products that appeal to anyone no matter the race or location.

That’s the emotional driving force behind what I’m doing with Komole…

(You know) there is a bizarre riddle on everybody’s mind. A complex, difficult to solve, matter, which is in fact actually very simple: The way to the better lives we seek is to give our economy the boost it needs by making, buying and exporting locally created products and services.

Especially, in fashion terms, we love products from France, Italy, etc. For instance French lace – who is going to stop our ladies wearing lace? They love the way it makes them feel, and then we call it “the highest quality” this or that and that adds to the feeling of grandeur. I just got tired off seemingly always calling something from somewhere else: “the highest quality”.

I could see local things here and there that to me were “the highest quality” – true some cases needed development, or refinement, but ironically the best results often arise when you just polish and present that which you see naturally occurring around you. Ok I will concede that one must have the talent of being able to see and imagine what something raw could be turned into…

It borders on a kind of self-hate when only things from elsewhere are considered the best quality – and I gave up hating a long time ago. I keep my energy on a positive slant; fast-forward a few years and we have collections like Komole.

Let me tell you something strange, Komole is for me, like a farmer surveying their land or estate. Every nook and cranny is a blessing to them, and the way the land looks at sunset is different from the way it looks at dawn, similarly I find new treasures in Aso-Oke all the time. I’m like that farmer and I’m proud of my land gon gon!

Komole – which means to dance- is occasion wear. By now, we must have realized that Nigerians throw the best “occasions” anywhere – the world is beginning to suspect this is true! We just know how to gba dun, you know, enjoy with our friends and family in that kind of setting. So, since we give the “highest quality“ occasions it is only right that we have the highest quality clothes to go with that.

But this time round I really didn’t care, I took the level of craftsmanship so high. Some people would ask me why I was putting so much into one garment, and now I don’t even have to explain anymore because it is plain to see. Seriously, whether created by me or not, who would dare to say that this Komole look is not beautiful. These ladies look regal!

In fact, I want to dress some Japanese and Swedish brides in Komole Iro and Buba and watch the jaws of their audiences drop! This is a celebration of Woman, pure and simple… On that wedding day you want your beau to have a silly grin on his face throughout, because you, and your family, are just tooo fine!

***

Credits
Fabrics and Designs: House of Deola
Photography: Kelechi Amadi Obi
Models: Few Models | Beth Model Management
Hair: Ugo of Make Me
Makeup: Bimpe Onakoya
Shoes: Polo Avenue
Creative Direction & Styling: Teni Sagoe
Jewelry: Aanushkil Jewellery
Bags: Vintage bags from the late Elizabeth Wuraola Ojo’s closet

60 Comments

  1. Ifeyinwa Mic

    February 22, 2016 at 5:24 pm

    Beautiful

    • Lomo

      February 23, 2016 at 1:36 am

      Chai!! Whoever ironed those clothes needs to be awarded PhD. Not one single crease!

    • Tell me

      February 26, 2016 at 8:02 pm

      A steamer can do the magic!!! Dressmakers in Nigeria get with the program!!!

  2. Naomi

    February 22, 2016 at 5:36 pm

    Beautiful concept tho but dont drool too much ooo its cost well well…

  3. glow

    February 22, 2016 at 5:38 pm

    Waoh!

  4. Dami

    February 22, 2016 at 5:41 pm

    Oh and I’m wearing one of this pieces for my wedding by God’s grace. I hope she won’t call 500k sha

    • mc

      February 22, 2016 at 7:02 pm

      I wonder how much the famous komole iro and Buba costs.

    • Someone Naughty

      February 22, 2016 at 11:11 pm

      Girl, you’re on the money. It starts at 500k. A friend of mine dreamed of being a Komole bride until she made enquiries from the brand and was told it starts at 500k.

      I admire her work and creativity and she just keeps raising the bar higher for Nigerian designers. With time, I believe it will become a little more affordable though all the pieces are custom made.

      How awesome can one get? Creating their own fabric ??????

    • Oluwakemi

      February 22, 2016 at 11:17 pm

      get ready for 500k darling

    • Iris

      February 23, 2016 at 7:13 am

      Lmao. Be there. With this economy, if you’re lucky she will START at 500k.

  5. FasholasLover

    February 22, 2016 at 5:46 pm

    IMPECCABLE!!!!! Now, this here is a fashion designer worth her name in gold.

  6. Giddygirl

    February 22, 2016 at 5:48 pm

    I love aaaaaalll of them!!! The colours, oh my!! I love every piece. Well done, House of Deola!

  7. AK

    February 22, 2016 at 5:49 pm

    Deola is BAE!!!!!!!
    One of the best things to ever come out of Africa!!!!!
    Hopefully I can afford her for my wedding in 20**

  8. the generous economist

    February 22, 2016 at 6:10 pm

    it will actaully cost 500k. one of my friends emailed and wnted the ivory iro and buba made, and they said 450k…

    • FasholasLover

      February 22, 2016 at 6:20 pm

      In which case we shall love from afar. But if you are able to fork out upwards of 1000 quid for an outfit, this shouldn’t cause those who can to sweat.

    • Truth Teller

      February 22, 2016 at 6:40 pm

      Huh?!? 450k Ke! Exactly what I wanted for one of my traditional wedding outfits, hian! ? In any case Great designs, all of them.

  9. dokpe

    February 22, 2016 at 6:20 pm

    Lovely designs. Very wearable too! The cost though……

  10. mc

    February 22, 2016 at 7:03 pm

    450k? For ordinary blouse and wrapper. Wow! Odiegwu!

  11. Iyosi

    February 22, 2016 at 7:09 pm

    Wow, I love Deola. In every sense she is truly visionary, perhaps ‘out of this world’. No one loves lace more than Nigerians, so I’ve always wondered why we couldn’t produce the highest quality lace in our own very own Nigeria, or create a variation that was truly ‘Nigerian’. I am inspired. I hope we will take after this, and create a new culture that will bring Komole to the world with our Aso oke and Nigerian lace. I hope she and other nigerian designers will make great innovations in fashion, infusing our cultural identity and fabrics into our designs. And God willing I can afford to have Deola design on my big day, that is of course after I find my Prince charming 🙂

  12. kay

    February 22, 2016 at 8:08 pm

    Wow, lovely. Can we also get the interviews on videos, i.e youtube,etc.

  13. j'suis belle

    February 22, 2016 at 8:22 pm

    gud job she really puts nigerian designers on another level,but the price though

  14. adisa

    February 22, 2016 at 8:58 pm

    Krush lamar and aduke bringing life to the cloths. I love all d designs and d models are awesome

  15. Mama Ijebu

    February 22, 2016 at 9:29 pm

    Outfit after outfit I just kept saying wow. Lovely pieces..very neat and professional..Obe to dun, owo lo pa mehn!

  16. Eshoppaz

    February 22, 2016 at 9:33 pm

    cute

  17. Tosin

    February 22, 2016 at 9:45 pm

    all I saw: “craftmanship so high”
    yes, art. show the world.

  18. Klicks

    February 22, 2016 at 9:52 pm

    Amazing

  19. Middle Girl

    February 22, 2016 at 10:46 pm

    In one word: beautiful.
    diaryofmsgenesis.com/home/

  20. lacey

    February 23, 2016 at 12:48 am

    After they will say buy Nigeria! but prices start at 500k, when I can get a nice wedding dress for budget of $200! who is fooling who? That was how I wanted help promote Ankara, so went to Lagos Island to buy Ankara N12oo, but five pieces of 6 yards only to inquire from one of our married Lekki wives who wears nicely sown ones, thinking that at most it will cost me N5000 to make each one and she told me her Tailors abi Fashion designer makes her for N40,000 each, now so I carry my Ankara go look for one lady that I paid my budgeted price on the mainland and took the rest to my state to give to the local Tailors. This was like 5 years ago! Them wan bury me with the wedding gown? God forbid, that was I waka about to Selfridges to the Nigerian designer section with their badly finished products with pricey tags!You guys should kontinu in Peshe’s voice, no more looting o!

    • Bade

      February 23, 2016 at 12:28 pm

      Why so angry? Did anybody force you to leave your mainland tailor? You are using ‘buy Nigeria’ as an platform to rant about your own personal economic situation. If you cannot afford it, just quietly nurse your oju kokoro in your bedroom naa. Hian!

    • lacey

      February 23, 2016 at 10:17 pm

      You Bade and Yinkus are the poverty mentality we talk about and thanks Evergreen dear!I do not currently reside in Nigeria and I would rather spend my hard earned $$ on quality that I can wear over time!

    • yinkus

      February 23, 2016 at 3:46 pm

      lol it’s not by force if you can’t afford it, stay in your lane

    • Ever Green

      February 23, 2016 at 5:51 pm

      @ Lacy I have a good local tailor that will give the so called Ajebutter fashion designer a run for their money, My colleagues and outsiders marvel when ever I put on native attires on fridays, if you are interested I will drop her number.

    • adelegirl

      February 23, 2016 at 7:40 pm

      Ever Green, please I’m interested. Please drop her number for me

    • Ese

      February 25, 2016 at 8:45 am

      Please I am interested o.. Thanks.

    • Anny 744

      July 17, 2016 at 12:47 pm

      Please I’m interested. I need the number. Thanks

  21. Are You There?

    February 23, 2016 at 5:52 am

    Where art thou, Bruno?

    We are in need of your opinion!!!!……..although I suspect some pips are NOT, but secretly others are…………. and you all know who you are! Lol!!!

  22. hezekina pollutina

    February 23, 2016 at 7:19 am

    fire!

  23. I just waka come...

    February 23, 2016 at 7:28 am

    Yes I know Nigerians love weddings, but NIGERIAN DESIGNERS can you address a niche that is a very powerful market: WORK WEAR for men and women????

    I keep asking why no credible designer has a work wear range.

    How many times will I marry? Once.
    How many times do go to work every week, on the average 25 days.
    So??????

    • Ivy

      February 23, 2016 at 9:45 am

      Check Adey soile…..fantastic pieces! I don’t like her new collection but the previous has gorgeous items.

    • Nikki

      February 23, 2016 at 2:26 pm

      Yes, Adey Soile came to my mind, in terms of good Nigerian work wear!

    • Bade

      February 23, 2016 at 12:30 pm

      You go to work 25 days a week?…… I think your issues are beyond work wear, my sister.

      1
    • eesha

      February 23, 2016 at 12:47 pm

      Lady Biba has plenty of work suitable clothes.

    • Sisi

      February 23, 2016 at 7:13 pm

      CLAN!

    • Eli

      February 26, 2016 at 8:52 pm

      …..is expensive. LOL

    • Yori

      February 23, 2016 at 11:38 pm

      Nothing to stop you from filling the gap. Go for it!

  24. Top Notch

    February 23, 2016 at 7:35 am

    Wow! Wow! Wow! Deola Sagoe is a true designer in every sense of the word. Is she expensive? I think its relative. Most designers right now are tailors, all copying each other from Instagram photos, sketches from Vogue, InStyle and any other fashion magazine they can get their hands on. A lot of the time you’re paying 80k for fabric and 30k to a tailor that won’t get it right. After two drycleans the iro and buba starts wearing out. Back then 130k was the equivalent of $800. Now not so much, but the point is if I walked into Gucci, YSL or Dolce & Gabbana and spent $800 on a dress I know for a fact it wouldn’t be falling apart after 2 washes. In fact my designer clothes are solid and intact 5 years down the line and this is the difference between buying Deola Sagoe and buying fabric from an Asoebi chick. It may cost 500k but I know it won’t be shedding any time soon.

  25. deedee

    February 23, 2016 at 7:39 am

    Lovely, lovely pieces but the prices though, i have always being a Deola fan since back in the day, i hope am able to fork out that kind of naira for my big day,oya booest boo where art thou?

  26. smh

    February 23, 2016 at 8:36 am

    500k for wetin,tailors don finish for market? thanks for design inspiration ma..i will take to my tailor.

  27. Olabisi Modele

    February 23, 2016 at 8:39 am

    Beautiful…….soooooo beautiful I say again…….she’s truly blessed and may she stand before kings….I am inspired….Tanx Deola for sharing

  28. Davida

    February 23, 2016 at 9:43 am

    This collection reminds me of Ejiro amos Tafiri…hmmmm

  29. molarah

    February 23, 2016 at 11:44 am

    Is it made in Nigeria??? That’s all I want to know. I don’t have money to dash any outside economy. Fabric is nice though.

  30. molarah

    February 23, 2016 at 11:47 am

    And the motifs don’t look like they are paying tribute to our culture – (Forest? Daisy? Clover? Why not cowrie, coral, palm, whatever). It’s sha nice, before someone comes to say I’m hating.

  31. Asaba ppty

    February 24, 2016 at 2:46 pm

    Deola, you finish work biko. This collection is stunning!

  32. Fabulousbutcheap

    February 24, 2016 at 4:46 pm

    Wow, wow, wow I kept looking at the collection non stop on her Instagram page yesterday. She is An amazing fashion designer and an inspiration to me. I can actually relate to @lacey and @topnotch, African collection in diaspora is very expensive. I remember when I first relocated to Newyork and I learnt of the price to make the regular Iro and Buba I was blown away it was absolutely rediculous. So I braced up and wen to a fashion school and right now I have an online store to fabulous African style but cheap and budget friendly. My vision is to make every African in diaspora able to afford African couture to preserve our beautiful and rich culture anywhere we go. So check my page on ig @fabulousbutcheap for y’all interested, pls feel free to chat me up as my website is not yet up,

  33. Nuhu Deborah

    February 26, 2016 at 1:10 am

    Deola is a fashion revolutionist. Am inspired by her works and all she has said about this collection. We really need to come out of this our way of life that has a constant appetite for foreign goods. We’ve got to embrace our culture and be proud of it any day anytime. The world should wear our brand. Wear komole, wear Ankara to an dinner. That’s what makes us different. Thanks Deola, u have no idea what door to opened up to as many young aspiring designer. God bless ur fashion sense.

  34. Nneka

    February 26, 2016 at 9:15 am

    Deola is a legend! The quality and craftsmanship shown in ALL her creations keep getting better. 12 years of research into the Komole range and it shows! I’m in complete awe of this woman’s talent, dedication and level of intelligence. From the first day I saw her creations many years ago I have wished for just one thing: to have a five minute conversation with her. This woman is exceptional!!!

  35. Stella

    February 26, 2016 at 1:37 pm

    Whaoo!! Breathtaking I must confess you are the best designer in Africa. Thanks for sharing

  36. Osaretin

    March 2, 2016 at 8:27 am

    Hmmmm 500k? interesting! Very beautiful work!!

  37. uche

    March 4, 2016 at 12:36 pm

    Bow down bow down

    Excellent finishing

    welldone
    this is so bae

  38. Erla Abdulmuta'Ali

    April 18, 2017 at 3:02 pm

    Your clothes are so beautiful, they’re different and I just love them, question is’ are they for purchasing?

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