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Anne Mmeje: Dear Nigerian Lawyers, Here’s How to Promote Your Practice Without Advertising

Anne M

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dreamstime_m_5843188The 2007 Nigerian Rules of Professional Conduct  prohibit certain types of advertising by Nigerian lawyers. For example, a lawyer is not allowed to  distribute circulars and bills, or advertise on  TV and newspapers.

However, the Rules also provides that a lawyer may write articles for publications, or participate in radio and television programmes in which he gives information on the law.

Interpreting the above, a lawyer may write informative blog posts, newspaper articles, etc. educating people on their rights, which is a form of content marketing.

Content marketing is defined by Content Marketing Institute as a strategic marketing approach focused on creating and distributing valuable, relevant and consistent content to attract and retain a clearly-defined audience — and, ultimately, to drive profitable customer action.

It is non-interruption marketing. Instead of pitching products or services, a business delivers information that makes a buyer more intelligent. The essence of this content strategy is the belief that if businesses deliver consistent, ongoing valuable information to buyers, buyers ultimately reward the organizations with their business and loyalty.

Forbes reports that 88% of B2B marketers use content marketing. Content marketing is used by some of the greatest marketing organizations in the world, including P&G, Microsoft, Cisco Systems, and John Deere.

When I was growing up in Nigeria in early 2000’s, for example, there  was a campaign by a leading toothpaste manufacturing company which advised people to brush morning and night. Instead of pitching how good their product was, the company took used TV and billboard ads to show monstrous creatures emerging from foul-smelling mouths at night. Without directly telling people to buy their products, the company taught people the importance of good oral hygiene and the need to brush also at night, not just in the morning.

The campaign influenced me to start brushing my teeth at night. Using this strategy, the company perhaps doubled its sales without directly telling their audience to buy their products. Content marketing works because people do not see it as a sales pitch and so are more likely to let down their guard when exposed to it.

Also, this August, Intel Nigeria launched a new campaign: “With a Computer, You are Powerful.” Rather than focus on their products, the campaign enlightens audience on the the many uses of a computer and showcases the new generation of successful  Nigerians You-tubers and bloggers who are using computers to make millions of naira, thereby educating consumers.

With the advent of internet, content marketing has become even more effective because people research online to find answers to various problems including legal, medical and financial issues. For example, if someone wants to incorporate their company in Nigeria, it’s likely they will google “How to incorporate a company in Nigeria” and not “Law firms that incorporate companies in Nigeria.”

From the above example, if there are two law firms that render company incorporation  services in Nigeria, SEO will favor the lawyer whose website contains step-by-step procedure for incorporating a company in Nigeria rather than the lawyer’s who simple states  somewhere in his website that he has a “Corporate practice.”

Given an opportunity to choose between the two law firms, a potential client is more likely to patronize the lawyer who already shows, through his blog posts, that he knows what is required to incorporate a company. By writing detailed posts on services they provide, lawyers are likely to attract clients who are researching on the types of services the lawyers render.

In Nigeria where laws are rarely enforced because people are unaware of laws that protect their rights, lawyers who embrace content marketing will, besides promoting their practice, also  be providing a much needed service of educating Nigerians of their rights.

For example, Lagos State Tenancy Law 2011 makes it a crime for landlords (in certain parts of Lagos) to collect more than one year rent in advance. The law also provides that a tenant who feels his rent has been unreasonably increased can  petition the court. I wager that 90% of Lagos residents are unaware of this law. A lawyer who writes about this can generate traffic to his website and engage readers who will turn into potential clients.

Also, for the past two years, following the oil bust, oil companies in Nigeria have been terminating their employees’ contracts in large numbers. I never knew this could be illegal until I read this BellaNaija post by Ivie Omoregie on the due process these oil companies must follow before firing an employee. From the post, I learned that before letting an employee go, an oil company must seek consent from the Minister of Petroleum. One wonders how many oil workers didn’t fight back and lost their jobs because they were unaware of this law.

Moreover, a business that  engages in content marketing establishes itself as a leader in the industry. Festus Keyamo and Femi Falana are among the most visible Nigerian lawyers because they talk about human rights on TV and newspapers. They have established themselves as authorities in the industry and anyone who has a human rights case naturally thinks of them because of their perceived expertise.

Content marketing is already popular among U.S. firms and is used by 90% of law firms. However, I researched most of the leading law firms in Nigeria and did not find one that provided the type of quality and consistent blogging needed to get a Return on Investment from content marketing.

For a high ROI through content marketing, a law firm should

  • Create quality blog posts using examples and scenarios.
  • Write articles commenting on important decisions by the Supreme court. (Here’s one I wrote when the Supreme Court held in Ukeje v. Ukeje that daughters in Igbo land now have right to inherit their fathers’ properties.)
  • Hijack news by providing legal opinion on the latest celebrity gossip.
  • Prepare a time-table scheduling consistent blog posts, for example, weekly etc.
  • Guest post educative legal blogs on popular Nigerian blogs.

Besides generating new clients, content marketing also opens up opportunities. I got my present day job through someone who read one of my blog posts. I wrote about other importance of blogging here.

Although this post is targeted at Nigerian lawyers, I hope this post inspires all small businesses  to consider content marketing as an advertising strategy as it has proven more effective than traditional marketing.

Photo Credit: Christopher Halloran | Dreamstime.com

4 Comments

  1. lauretta

    August 29, 2016 at 5:41 pm

    This is Beautifully Marelous, im studying law tho, thanks aunty Bella mmmuuaaahhhh

  2. mars

    August 29, 2016 at 6:50 pm

    Yea

  3. Akinduro

    September 14, 2016 at 9:25 pm

    I wonder how the law body will want to separate law firms from entrepreneurship. Though am not a practicing lawyer, I opine that alienating them from promotional means is, to me, not good enough.

    But that they are permitted to own a blog is an opportunity to see their enterprises grow with emerging media. That is what everyone has been clamouring for as entrepreneurs. the team at PetaSales ( http://PetaSales.com ) has been doing well educating entrepreneurs on the importance of this.

    I wrote a piece on some habits of African entrepreneurs that kill business. ( can be found here ==>> http://blog.petasales.com/habits-of-african-entrepreneurs-that-kill-business/). Non use of modern marketing means is one of the habits we considered, in relation to how it kills business.

    Hi five to Anne Mmeje for this piece and joining in the crusade to grow businesses with this cheap tool for business growth.

  4. Akinduro

    September 14, 2016 at 10:26 pm

    I wonder how the law body will want to separate law firms from entrepreneurship. Though am not a practicing lawyer, I opine that alienating them from promotional means is, to me, not good enough.

    But that they are permitted to own a blog is an opportunity to see their enterprises grow with emerging media. That is what everyone has been clamouring for as entrepreneurs. the team at PetaSales ( http://PetaSales.com ) has been doing well educating entrepreneurs on the importance of this.

    I wrote a piece on some habits of African entrepreneurs that kill business. ( can be found here ==>> http://blog.petasales.com/habits-of-african-entrepreneurs-that-kill-business/). Non use of modern marketing means is one of the habits we considered, in relation to how it kills business.

    Hi five to Anne Mmeje for this piece and joining in the crusade to grow businesses with this cheap tool for business growth.

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