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Durex marks World AIDS Day with unofficial launch of Condom Emoji

BellaNaija.com

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  • Open Umbrella with Raindrops” emoji the top choice following a global poll to find unofficial safe sex emoji in response to Unicode’s rejection of a Condom Emoji earlier this year.
  • Durex research showed that more than 75% of 16-35 year olds use emojis to discuss sex, with 9 out of 10 believing that a safe sex emoji will help people to talk more openly practicing safe sex with their partners.
  • Almost 50% of 16-35 year olds think that HIV is not something that could ever affect them2 despite the fact that every 30 seconds a young person is infected with HIV3
  • More than 60% of young people surveyed1 confirmed that they are uncomfortable discussing safe sex
  • The International Planned Parenthood Federation join forces with Durex on December 1st to raise awareness of the risks of unprotected sex

The World’s leading sexual wellbeing brand, Durex, have today announced “Umbrella with Raindrops” as the overwhelming choice (23.3%) in a global poll to find the unofficial safe sex emoji.

Shockingly, almost half of 16-35 year olds think that HIV is not something that could ever affect them despite the fact that every 30 seconds a young person is infected with HIV3.

Whilst more than 60% of young people surveyed admitted to being uncomfortable discussing safe sex, 72% of respondants surveyed admitted they found it easier to express emotions using emojis and more than three quarters admitted that they use emojis to discuss sex and relationships.

The unveiling of an unofficial safe sex emoji is the latest move in Durex’s ongoing #CondomEmoji campaign which calls for Unicode to put a safe sex emoji on every smartphone in the world in order to help young people communicate about safe sex more easily.

To date, the #CondomEmoji campaign has trended on both Twitter and Facebook with supporters from over 160 countries backing the movement, and has seen high profile support on social media from global organisations including the International Planned Parenthood Association, Terrence Higgins Trust and New Zealand AIDS Foundation. Durex hopes that the popularity of the unofficial safe sex emoji will demonstrate what the 9 out of 10 surveyed confirmed; that a safe sex emoji would be a step towards empowering young people to talk about safe sex – and encourage Unicode to reconsider their decision to reject the original application.

Durex Global Category Director, Volker Sydow, said: “Until Unicode recognise the need for a Condom Emoji and reverse their decision to put a safe sex emoji on every smartphone across the globe, we must continue to  demonstrate that there is the desire for such a thing.  We believe the naming of “Umbrella with Raindrops” as the unofficial safe sex emoji will be a significant step towards helping young people put safe sex back on the agenda. We are asking people to show their support for the cause on World AIDS Day 2016 by using this unofficial safe sex emoji and the hashtag #CondomEmoji.”

The campaign has also received the support of the International Planned Parenthood Association (IPPF), with Director General Tewodros Melesse adding: “Safe sex awareness continues to be an important global challenge. We support Durex’s campaign in helping make young people think about protection. On World AIDS Day we will be backing this effort to help raise awarness of the risks associated with unprotected sex.”

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12 Comments

  1. Tosin

    November 30, 2016 at 7:36 pm

    under my umbrella 🙂

  2. bruno

    November 30, 2016 at 7:45 pm

    pls no pastor or prophet can cure hiv/aids. pls nigerians wake up. condoms are the most effective way of preventing hiv.

    hiv has no cure. scientists (not ur pastor or daddy in the lord or bishop or whatever u call them these days)are working hard to find the cure and we should support and encourage them

    I would have loved to ask about the drug Prep or truvada, but I know no nigerian doctor has ever heard of it or knows what it is.

    pls doctors abroad enlighten us about prep, does it really prevent hiv?

    • Marian

      November 30, 2016 at 10:58 pm

      You don’t have to be aggressive and insult people to get your point accross. Don’t underestimate people either.

      Truvada will reduce HIV risk but it’s not to be used alone as a preventive method plus it’s very expensive so I don’t see insurance covering it unless you are high risk. People married to someone who is hiv postive or amonst gay. After abstinence, Barrier method is still the next best thing.

      Approximate retail price is $1672.99

    • Marian

      November 30, 2016 at 10:58 pm

      For a 1 month supply

    • Ginger

      December 1, 2016 at 2:43 am

      @Marian you mention gay people with Truveda, but being gay doesn’t increase your chances of being HIV positive. Their rates are higher especially in America because they are/were less likely to use condoms, but I’m sure a lot of them know better now. The original idea dates to a Victorian ploy by vicars (many of whom doubled as physicians) to medicalise homosexuals and prostitutes as pathologies. If you’re promiscuous, irrespective of your sexualiity, then your chances are increased. You don’t know how many wealthy Nigerian men have contracted HIV via exercising their “natural right” to cheat on their “enduring” wives, many of whom now also have HIV/AIDS. I know someone whose husband was privately treating himself but didn’t tell his wife, who eventually died of AIDS. It happens everyday. If you’re staying with your cheating partner because of your pastor or society or whatever, use a condom and get tested regularly.

  3. Ekene

    November 30, 2016 at 8:29 pm

    They should subsidise their condoms that will be the best awareness

  4. Nnamdi

    December 1, 2016 at 12:29 am

    Not using a condom was what made my cousin catch the virus. Left behind a wife and 3 kids @ just 40 years. Am I angry he dipped out on his wife? No not really, it’s a concensus that Nigerian men are cheaters (I beg to differ) but I am very angry he didn’t practise safe sex cos guess what, now he’s fucking dead. Died 2 months after my son’s birth, after we had just spoken few months before. I still mourn him 3 years after. His smile, his style, he was so fly gosh I can’t deny how I admired him. Too late now, he’s gone.

    • Xoxo

      December 1, 2016 at 1:12 pm

      You’re not angry he cheated on his wife but you’re angry he didn’t use a condom??? Wow. So its okay to cheat on your spouse as long as you use a condom??? SMH. Oshi

    • oo

      December 1, 2016 at 1:26 pm

      If you were patient enough and digested what Nnamdi was saying, you wont jump into conclusions. Where did he insinuate that it is ok to cheat on your partner whilst using protection? His metaphor was that he was stupid for being reckless with his life.
      Go cut yourself a switch honey

    • Xoxo

      December 1, 2016 at 5:03 pm

      oo if you were patient enough you’ll see I asked 2 questions. Hence the question marks…. When did asking questions for clarity sake become a problem. Please swerve. Quit acting like I’m trying to start anything because your reply shows you’re the one trying to instigate an issue. I saw what he typed and I was trying to clarify. Enjoy the rest of your day.

  5. Marian

    December 1, 2016 at 5:52 am

    @Ginger In the U.S we consider Men who have sex with Men as high risk for HIV. Data supports this. Don’t feel like looking it up now. Just google high risk group for hiv or something like that and you should be able to find the data.

  6. Marian

    December 1, 2016 at 5:59 am

    @Ginger having multiple partners will increase your chances but the solution to that is just to stop having unprotected sex with multiple people. If i have a patient who cheats around on his wife sure truvada will probably be helpful but no way i’m convincing his insurance company to pay for it when all he has to do is STOP. A gay person on the other hand is a different story. The HIV population where i live now is really low so truvada is not something i’ve seen in daily practice. I know how insurance company work though.

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